Etymology
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locution (n.)

"style of speech," early 15c., from Latin locutionem (nominative locutio) "a speaking, speech, discourse; way of speaking," noun of action from past-participle stem of loqui "to speak," from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak." Related: Locutionary.

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cant (v.1)
1560s, "to speak in a whining voice," from cant (n.1). From c. 1600 as "to speak in the jargon of thieves and vagabonds;" 1670s as "talk hypocritically in pompous phraseology." Related: Canted; canting.
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muteness (n.)

"dumbness, forbearance from speaking or inability to speak," 1580s, from mute (adj.) + -ness.

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phoneme (n.)

"distinctive sound or group of sounds," 1889, from French phonème, from Greek phōnēma "a sound made, voice," from phōnein "to sound or speak," from phōnē "sound, voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say"). Related: Phonematic.

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loquacity (n.)
c. 1200, from Latin loquacitatem (nominative loquacitas) "talkativeness," from loquax "talkative," from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). An Old English word for it was ofersprecolnes. Compare French loquacité, Spanish locuacidad, Italian loquacità.
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alexia (n.)
"inability to read" as a result of some mental condition, 1878, from Greek a- "not" (see a- (3)) + abstract noun from lexis "a speaking or reading," from legein "to speak," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')."
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mouth (v.)

early 14c., "to speak," from mouth (n.). Related: Mouthed; mouthing. Old English had muðettan "to blab." In 17c.-18c. especially "to speak pompously or affectedly." Meaning "form the shape of words with the mouth without uttering them" is by 1953.

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blandiloquence (n.)
"flattery in speech," 1650s, from Latin blandiloquentia, from blandiloquens "speaking flatteringly," from blandus "flattering, alluring" (see bland) + loquens, from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). Blandiloquous is attested earlier (1610s). Latin also had blandiloquentulus "flattering in speech."
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extemporize (v.)
1640s (implied in extemporizing), "to speak ex tempore," from extempore + -ize. Related: Extemporized.
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vox 

Latin, literally "voice," which is the source of vocare "to call" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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