Etymology
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gunman (n.)

1620s, from gun (n.) + man (n.). In early American English use, especially of Indian warriors.

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titi (n.)

type of small South American monkey, 1832, from native name in Tupi, probably imitative.

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Bolivia 

South American republic, founded 1825, named for Simon Bolivar (1783-1830), statesman and soldier.

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Sabal (n.)

a genus of fan-palms of tropical Americas, 1763, said to be from a South American or Mexican name.

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shebeen (n.)

"cabin where unlicensed liquor is sold and drunk," 1781, chiefly in Ireland and Scotland, from Irish seibin "small mug," also "bad ale," diminutive of seibe "mug, bottle, liquid measure." The word immigrated and persisted in South African and West Indian English.

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capybara (n.)

also capibara, large South American rodent, 1774, from the Tupi (Brazilian) native name.

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Pierre 

Modern French form of the masc. proper name represented in Modern English by Peter (q.v.). The city in South Dakota, U.S., was named for Pierre Chouteau (1789-1865) who set up an Indian trading post there in 1837.

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corn-pone (n.)

"Indian-corn bread made with milk and eggs and baked in a pan," 1848, American English, from corn (n.1) + pone (n.).

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tamale (n.)

1856, false singular from tamales (1690s), from American Spanish tamales, plural of tamal, from Nahuatl tamal, tamalli, a food made of Indian corn and meat.

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llama (n.)

wooly-haired South American ruminant, relative of the Old World camels, c. 1600, from Spanish llama (1535), from Quechua (Inca) llama.

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