Etymology
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chiliad (n.)

"group of 1,000" (of the same sort), 1590s; "period of a thousand years" (1660s), from Latinized form of Greek khiliados, from khilioi "a thousand; the number 1,000" (see chiliasm). Related: Chiliadal, chiliadic.

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suffragette (n.)

"female supporter of the cause of women's voting rights," 1906, from suffrage, with French fem. ending -ette, but not in the sense in which it was in vogue at the time.

suffragette. A more regrettable formation than others such as leaderette & flannelette, in that it does not even mean a sort of suffrage as they mean a sort of leader & of flannel, & therefore tends to vitiate the popular conception of the termination's meaning. The word itself may now be expected to die, having lost its importance; may its influence on word-making die with it! [Fowler, 1926]

Compare suffragist.

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bop (v.)

"to hit, strike, punch," 1931, imitative. As a noun from 1934. The sense of "play bop music, play (a song) in a bop style" is from 1948, from bop (n.). It soon came to mean "do any sort of dance to pop music" (1956). Related: Bopped; bopping.

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hotel (n.)

1640s, "public official residence; large private residence," from French hôtel "a mansion, palace, large house," from Old French ostel, hostel "a lodging" (see hostel). Modern sense of "an inn of the better sort" is first recorded 1765. The same word as hospital.

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Brown Shirt (n.)

generic term for "Nazi, fascist," especially of the thuggish sort, 1934, originally (1922) in reference to the German Sturmabteilung ("Storm Detachment"), the Nazi party militia founded 1921; they were called Brown Shirts in English because of their uniforms.

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yay 

"this," as in yay big "this big," 1950s, perhaps from yea "yes" in its sense of "even, truly, verily." "a sort of demonstrative adverb used with adjectives of size, height, extent, etc., and often accompanied by a hand gesture indicating size" [DAS].

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daw (n.)

"jackdaw, small sort of crow," early 15c., daue, perhaps from an unrecorded Old English *dawe, from Proto-Germanic *dakhwo (source also of Old High German taha, German Dohle), perhaps imitative of bird's cry. Medieval Latin tacula, Italian taccola are said to be Germanic loan words.

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pandowdy (n.)

also pandoulde, etc., "pudding of bread and apples baked together," usually cooked with molasses," 1846, American English colloquial, of uncertain origin. It appears as the name of a character in a temperance story from 1839, and pandoodle is the name of some sort of dish available on a sailing ship in 1775.

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golly (interj.)

euphemism for God, by 1775, in Gilbert White's journal; he refers to it as "a sort of jolly kind of oath, or asseveration much in use among our carters, & the lowest people."

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cross-eyes 

also crosseyes, "want of concordance in the optic axes, strabismus, the sort of squint in which both eyes turn toward the nose," 1826; perhaps derived from cross-eyed (1770); see cross- + eye (n.).

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