Etymology
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nitrification (n.)

"process by which nitrogen in soil is oxidized to nitric acid," 1789, from French nitrification (1778), from nitrifier (1777), from nitre (see nitre). English nitrify "convert into nitre" is attested by 1800.

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shim (n.)
1723, a Kentish word of unknown origin. Originally a piece of iron fitted to a plow for scraping soil; meaning "thin slip of wood to fill up a space or raise a level" is from 1860.
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antichthon (n.)

c. 1600, antichthones (plural), from Latin antichthontes, from Greek antikhthontes "people of the opposite hemisphere," from anti "opposite" (see anti-) + khthōn "land, earth, soil" (from PIE root *dhghem- "earth"). In Pythagorean philosophy, an imagined invisible double of earth.

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pedology (n.)

"scientific study of the soil," 1924, from German pedologie (1862) or French pédologie (1899), ultimately from Greek pedon "ground, earth" (from suffixed form of PIE root *ped- "foot") + -logy. Related: Pedological. Earlier it was a word for "the study of children" (1894), from pedo-.

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inhume (v.)
"bury, lay in the grave," c. 1600, from Latin inhumare "to bury," literally "to put into the ground," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + humus "earth, soil" (see humus). Related: Inhumed; inhuming.
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bedrock (n.)
also bed-rock, in geology, "solid rock lying under soil or gravel," 1850, from bed (n.) + rock (n.). Figurative use by 1869; as an adjective by 1881.
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polder (n.)

c. 1600, in reference to the Netherlands, Flanders, and Frisia, "boggy or marshy soil," especially a tract of marshy land which as been reclaimed and brought under cultivation, from Dutch polder, from Middle Dutch polre, related to East Frisian poller, polder, words of unknown origin.

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bottom (n.)

Old English botm, bodan "ground, soil, foundation, lowest or deepest part of anything," from Proto-Germanic *buthm- (source also of Old Frisian boden "soil," Old Norse botn, Dutch bodem, Old High German bodam, German Boden "ground, earth, soil"). This is perhaps from PIE root *bhudhno- "bottom" (source also of Sanskrit budhnah, Avestan buna- "bottom," Greek pythmen "foundation," Latin fundus "bottom, piece of land, farm," Old Irish bond "sole of the foot").

Meaning "fundamental character, essence" is from 1570s; to get to the bottom of some matter is from 1773. Meaning "posterior of a person" (the sitting part) is from 1794. Bottoms up as a call to finish one's drink is from 1875. Bottom dollar "the last dollar one has" is from 1857. To do or feel something from the bottom of (one's) heart is from 1540s. Bottom-feeder, originally of fishes, is from 1866.

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Semele 
daughter of Cadmus and mother of Dionysus, from Latin, from Greek Semele, a Thraco-Phrygian earth goddess, from Phrygian Zemele "mother of the earth," probably cognate with Old Church Slavonic zemlja "earth," Latin humus "earth, ground, soil" (from PIE root *dhghem- "earth").
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azalea (n.)

type of flowering shrub, 1753, Modern Latin, coined by Linnaeus from the fem. of Greek azaleos "dry," related to azein "to dry up," probably from PIE root *as- "to burn, glow." The plant thrives in sandy soil.

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