Etymology
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plasmid (n.)

"genetic structure in a cell that can replicate independently of the chromosomes," 1952, from plasma + -id.

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cannery (n.)

"establishment for preserving meats, fish, fruits, etc. in airtight cans," 1872, from can (v.2) + -ery.

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shovelful (n.)

"as much as a shovel can hold or lift at one time," 1530s, from shovel (n.) + -ful.

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suggestible (adj.)

1851, "capable of being influenced," from suggest + -ible. Meaning "that can be suggested" is from 1836. Related: Suggestibly; suggestibility.

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pop (n.1)

"a hit with a smart, explosive sound," c. 1400, of imitative origin. Meaning "effervescent carbonated beverage" is from 1812.

A new manufactory of a nectar, between soda-water and ginger-beer, and called pop, because 'pop goes the cork' when it is drawn. [Southey, letter, 1812]

Sense of "ice cream on a stick" is from 1923 (see popsicle). Meaning "the (brief) time of a 'pop'" is from 1530s. Pop goes the weasel, a country dance, was popular 1850s in school yards, with organ grinders, at court balls, etc.

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wryneck (n.)

1580s, from wry + neck (n.). The bird so called from the singular manner in which is can twist the neck.

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clasp-hook (n.)

"pair of hooks provided with a ring which can hold them together," 1841, from clasp (n.) + hook (n.).

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ne plus ultra 

"utmost limit to which one can go," Latin, literally "no more beyond;" the motto traditionally inscribed on the Pillars of Hercules.

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judicable (adj.)

1640s, from Late Latin iudicabilis "that can be judged," from iudicare "to judge," which is related to iudicem "a judge" (see judge (n.)).

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alienable (adj.)

"that can be surrendered or given up," 1610s; from obsolete alien (v.), for which see alienate, + -able. Related: Alienability.

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