Etymology
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sociobiology (n.)
"study of the biological basis of social behavior," 1946, from socio- + biology. Related: Sociobiological.
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situs (n.)
Latin, "situation, position" (see site). In technical uses in English, "proper or original position and location of something" (as in in situ).
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emancipated (adj.)
1726, "set free," past-participle adjective from emancipate (v.). Meaning "freed from custom or social restraints" is from 1850.
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clubby (adj.)
"of a social disposition," 1859, from club (n.) in the associative sense + -y (2). Related: Clubbily; clubbiness.
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Hiroshima 
city in Japan, literally "broad island," from Japanese hiro "broad" + shima "island." So called in reference to its situation on the delta of the Ota River.
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briefing (n.)
"fact or situation of giving preliminary instructions," 1910 (but popularized by World War II pre-flight conferences), verbal noun from brief (v.).
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misalliance (n.)

"marriage with a person of lower social position,"  1738, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + alliance. Compare mesalliance.

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predicament (n.)

early 15c., in philosophy, "category, class; one of Aristotle's 10 categories," from Medieval Latin predicamentum, from Late Latin praedicamentum "quality, category, something predicted, that which is asserted," from Latin praedicatus, past participle of praedicare "assert, proclaim, declare publicly," from prae- "forth, before" (see pre-) + dicare "proclaim" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly," and see diction). Praedicamentum is a loan-translation of Greek kategoria, Aristotle's word.

The meaning "unpleasant, dangerous, or trying situation" is a particular negative use of the general sense of "a state of being, condition, situation" (1580s).

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antarchism (n.)
"opposition to all social government or control of individuals by law," 1845, from antarchy + -ism. Related: Antarchist; antarchistic.
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sociality (n.)
1640s, from French socialité or directly from Latin socialitas "fellowship, sociableness," from socialis (see social (adj.)).
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