Etymology
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socio- 
word-forming element meaning "social, of society; social and," also "having to do with sociology," from combining form of Latin socius "companion, ally, associate, fellow, sharer," from PIE *sokw-yo-, suffixed form of root *sekw- (1) "to follow." Common in compounds since c. 1880.
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bewilderment (n.)
1789, "state or condition of being bewildered," from bewilder + -ment; meaning "thing or situation which bewilders" is from 1840.
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shut-in (n.)
"person confined from normal social intercourse," 1904, from the verbal phrase, from shut (v.) + in (adv.).
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underclass (n.)
"subordinate social class," 1894, from under (adj.) + class (n.). A loan-translation of Swedish underklass.
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sociobiology (n.)
"study of the biological basis of social behavior," 1946, from socio- + biology. Related: Sociobiological.
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situs (n.)
Latin, "situation, position" (see site). In technical uses in English, "proper or original position and location of something" (as in in situ).
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emancipated (adj.)
1726, "set free," past-participle adjective from emancipate (v.). Meaning "freed from custom or social restraints" is from 1850.
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clubby (adj.)
"of a social disposition," 1859, from club (n.) in the associative sense + -y (2). Related: Clubbily; clubbiness.
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-lect 
word-forming element abstracted 20c. from dialect and in words meaning a regional or social variety of a language.
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Hiroshima 
city in Japan, literally "broad island," from Japanese hiro "broad" + shima "island." So called in reference to its situation on the delta of the Ota River.
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