Etymology
Advertisement
eyesore (n.)
c. 1300, "a soreness of the eyes" (obsolete); modern sense of "something offensive to the eye" is from 1520s; from eye (n.) + sore (n.). In the sense "eye disease" Old English had eagseoung.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
oculus (n.)
"an eye," plural oculi, 1857, from Latin oculus "an eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see").
Related entries & more 
eyeball (n.)

also eye-ball, "the ball or globe of the eye," so called for its shape, 1580s, from eye (n.) + ball (n.1), which is attested from c. 1400 in the sense "spherical structure of the eye." As a verb, 1901, American English slang. Related: Eyeballed; eyeballing.

Related entries & more 
eyebrow (n.)
also eye-brow, early 15c., from eye (n.) + brow (q.v.; Old English eagbræw meant "eyelid").
Related entries & more 
ophthalmo- 

before vowels ophthalm-, word-forming element meaning "eye," mostly in plural, "the eyes," from Greek ophthalmos "eye," originally "the seeing," a word of uncertain origin. Perhaps from ōps "eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see") + a form related to thalamos "inner room, chamber" (see thalamus), giving the whole a sense of "eye and eye socket," but Beekes rejects all this and finds it to be probably Pre-Greek.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ashore (adv.)
1580s, "toward the shore," from a- (1) + shore (n.). Meaning "on the shore" is from 1630s. Middle English had ashore (late 15c.), but it meant "on a slant," literally "propped up," from shore (v.).
Related entries & more 
eyeful (n.)
also eye-ful, "good look at," 1796, originally in ornamental gardening, from eye (n.) + -ful.
Related entries & more 
eyelet (n.)

"small hole," late 14c., oilet, from Old French oeillet, diminutive of oeil "eye," from Latin oculus "an eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see"). Spelling later modified by influence of eye (n.).

Related entries & more 
monocular (adj.)

"having only one eye; of or referring to vision with one eye," 1630s, from Late Latin monoculus "one-eyed," from Greek monos "alone, single" (from PIE root *men- (4) "small, isolated") + Latin oculus "eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see").

Related entries & more 
pigsney (n.)

(obsolete), late 14c., pigges-nie, an endearing form of address to a girl or woman, apparently from Middle English pigges eye, literally "pig's eye," from pig (n.1) + neyghe, a variant of eye (n.) with unetymological -n- from min eye, an eye, etc. (see N). But pig-eyed is "having small, dull eyes with heavy lids, appearing sunken." See OED for explanation of why pig's eye might have been felt as a compliment. In a pig's eye! as an adverse retort is recorded from 1872.

Hir shoes were laced on hir legges hye; She was a prymerole, a piggesnye, For any lord to leggen in his bedde. [Chaucer, "Miller's Tale"]
Related entries & more 

Page 4