Etymology
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divvy (v.)

"to divide (up)," 1877, American English, originally a noun (1865), a slang shortening of dividend. The verb is primary now (the noun is not in "Webster's New World Dictionary"), leading some (such as "Webster's") to think the word is a slang alteration of divide. Related: Divvying. In early 20c. British slang the same word was a shortening of divine (adj.).

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glim (n.)
in 18c. slang, "a light, candle, lantern" (1700); in 19c. slang "an eye" (1820), probably a back-formation from glimmer (n.) or in some cases glimpse (n.). Related: Glims.
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tiddlywinks (n.)
children's tile-flipping game, 1857, probably an arbitrary formation from baby talk, but perhaps from slang tiddly-wink "unlicensed drink shop" (1844), from slang tiddly "a drink, drunk."
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fem (n.)
slang for "woman," by 1936, from female.
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digs (n.)

"lodgings," slang attested from 1893, from dig (n.).

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frat (n.)
student slang shortening of fraternity, by 1888.
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simp (n.)
1903, circus slang shortening of simpleton.
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lude (n.)
slang shortening of quaalude, by 1973.
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oke 
slang clipping of OK, attested from 1929.
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tude (n.)
teenager slang shortening of attitude, 1970s.
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