Etymology
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broadside (n.)
"side of a ship" (technically, "the side of a ship above the water, between the bow and the quarter"), 1590s, from broad (adj.) + side (n.); thus "the artillery on one side of a ship all fired off at once" (1590s, with figurative extensions). Two words until late 18c.

Of things other than ships, 1630s. But oldest-recorded sense in English is "sheet of paper printed only on one side" (1570s). As an adverb by 1870; as an adjective by 1932. As a verb from 1930, "to skid sideways" (intransitive); transitive sense "to strike broadside, collide with the side of" is by 1970.
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seaside (n.)
also sea-side, c. 1200, from sea + side (n.). As an adjective from 1781. Old English had sæhealf.
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roadside (n.)

"the side or border of a road," 1744, from road (n.) + side (n.). As an adjective by 1810.

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downside (n.)

also down side, 1680s, "underside;" see down (adv.) + side (n.). Meaning "drawback, negative aspect" is attested by 1995.

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cismontane (adj.)

"situated on (the speaker's) side of the mountain or mountains," 1826, from Latin cis- "on this side of" (see cis-) + stem of mons "mountain" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project"). Specifically "on the north side of the Alps" (compare ultramontane).

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stateside (adj.)
also state-side, 1944, World War II U.S. military slang, from the States "United States" (see state (n.2)) + side.
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sidelong (adv.)

"toward the side," 1570s, alteration of Middle English sidlyng (see sidle), probably by influence of side (n.) + long (adj.). As an adjective from 1590s.

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latero- 

combining form used from 19c. to represent Latin latus "the side, flank of humans or animals, lateral surface," a word of uncertain origin. The Latin word also was used to express intimacy, attachment, or relationship via the notion of "attach to the side, at the side of."

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behalf (n.)
c. 1300, behalve (with dative suffix), "for the sake or benefit, advantage, interest" (of someone), from Old English (him) be healfe "by (his) side," and, incorrectly, from on (his) healfe "on (his) side," from healfe "side" (see half). The word was confused with Middle English behalve, behalves (adv. and prep.) "by the side of, near."
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effects (n.)
"goods, property," 1704, plural of effect (n.); after a use of French effets.
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