Etymology
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denunciation (n.)

early 15c., denunciacioun, "act of declaring or stating something" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin denunciacionem / denuntiationem (nominative denuntiatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of denuntiare "to announce, proclaim; denounce, menace; command, order," from de "down" (see de-) + nuntiare "proclaim, announce," from nuntius "messenger" (from PIE root *neu- "to shout"). Meaning "a charge, a solemn or formal declaration accompanied by a menace" is mid-15c.

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clamor (n.)

late 14c., "a great outcry," also figurative, "loud or urgent demand," from Old French clamor "call, cry, appeal, outcry" (12c., Modern French clameur), from Latin clamor "a shout, a loud call" (either friendly or hostile), from clamare "to cry out" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout").

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jubilate (v.)
"make a joyful noise," 1640s, from Latin iubilatus, past participle of iubilare "shout for joy" (see jubilant). Related: Jubilated; jubilating.
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declamatory (adj.)

"of or characteristic of a declamation," 1580s, from Latin declamatorius "pertaining to the practice of speaking," from declamatus, past participle of declamare "to practice public speaking, to bluster," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clamare "to cry, shout" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout").

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acclaim (n.)
"act of acclaiming, a shout of joy," 1667 (in Milton), from acclaim (v.).
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acclamation (n.)

1540s, "act of shouting or applauding in approval," from Latin acclamationem (nominative acclamatio) "a calling, exclamation, shout of approval," noun of action from past-participle stem of acclamare "to call to, cry out at, shout approval or disapproval of," from assimilated form of ad "to, toward" (see ad-) + clamare "cry out," from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout." As a method of spontaneous approval of resolutions, etc., by unanimous voice vote, by 1801, probably from the French Revolution.

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clamorous (adj.)

noisy, vociferous," c. 1400, from Medieval Latin clamorosus, from Latin clamor "a shout" (see clamor (n.)). Related: Clamorously; clamorousness.

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disclaim (v.)

c. 1400, disclaimen, "renounce, relinquish, or repudiate a legal claim," originally in a feudal sense, from Anglo-French disclaimer(c. 1300), Old French desclamer "disclaim, disavow," from des- (see dis-) + clamer "to claim," from Latin clamare "to cry out, shout, proclaim," from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout." Meaning "disavow any connection with, reject as not belonging to oneself" is from 1590s. Related: Disclaimed; disclaiming.

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oi (interj.)

1962, vulgar or working class pronunciation of hoy a call or shout to attract attention (compare ahoy).

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vociferation (n.)

c. 1400, from Latin vociferationem (nominative vociferatio), "a loud calling, clamor, outcry," noun of action from past-participle stem of vociferari "to shout, yell, cry out" (see vociferous).

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