Etymology
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bathrobe (n.)

also bath-robe, "robe worn before or after taking a bath," 1894, from bath (n.) + robe (n.).

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capo (n.2)

"pitch-altering device for a stringed instrument," 1946, short for capo tasto (1876), from Italian, literally "head stop," from Latin caput "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head") + tasto "key; touch."

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stew (n.)

c. 1300, "vessel for cooking," from stew (v.). Later "heated room," especially for bathing (late 14c.). The meaning "stewed meat with vegetables" is first recorded 1756. The obsolete slang meaning "brothel" (mid-14c., usually plural, stews) is from a parallel sense of "public bath house" (mid-14c.), carried over from Old French estuve "bath, bath house; bawdy house," reflecting the reputation of medieval bath houses.

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stutter (v.)

1560s, frequentative form of stutt "to stutter," from Middle English stutten "to stutter, stammer" (late 14c.), cognate with Middle Low German stoten "to knock, strike against, collide," from Proto-Germanic *staut- "push, thrust" (source also of Old Saxon stotan, Old High German stozan, Gothic stautan "to push, thrust;" German stutzen "to cut short, curtail; to stop short, hesitate," Dutch stuiten "to stop, check, arrest, stem."), from PIE *(s)teu- (1) "to hit, beat, knock against" (see steep (adj.)). The noun is attested from 1854. Related: Stuttered; stuttering; stutterer.

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bathtub (n.)

also bath-tub, "a tub to bathe in," especially as a permanent fixture of a bathroom, 1837, from bath + tub. Prohibition-era bathtub gin is recorded by 1928.

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bathe (v.)

Middle English bathen, from Old English baþian "to wash, lave, place in a bath, take a bath" (transitive and intransitive), from the source of bath (q.v.), with different vowel sound due to i-mutation. Related: Bathed; bathing. Similar verbs in Old Norse baða, Old High German badon, German baden.

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balneal (adj.)

"pertaining to baths," 1640s, with -al (1) + Latin balneum "bath," from Greek balaneion "warm bath, bathing room," which is of unknown origin. Balneography (1841) is the description of baths and medicinal springs.

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stopwatch (n.)

also stop-watch, 1737, from stop (v.) + watch (n.).

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stove (n.)

mid-15c., "heated room, bath-room," from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch stove, both meaning "heated room," which was the original sense in English; a general West Germanic word (Old English stofa "bath-room," Old High German stuba, German Stube "sitting room").

Of uncertain relationship to similar words in Romance languages (Italian stufa, French étuve "sweating-room;" see stew (v.)). One theory traces them all to Vulgar Latin *extufare "take a steam bath." The meaning "device for heating or cooking" is first recorded 1610s.

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backstop (n.)

1819, "something at the back as a barrier;" see back (adj.) + stop (n.). In U.S. baseball, from 1889, "fence a short distance behind the catcher on a baseball team;" the figurative extension to the catcher himself is by 1890. The verb is attested from 1956 in the sense of "support." Related: Backstopped; backstopping.

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