Etymology
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psycho (n.)

1925 as short for psychologist; (earlier short for psychology, 1921); as short for psychopath by 1942.

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brief (adj.)
c. 1300, bref, "of short duration;" early 14c., "small with respect to length, short;" from Latin brevis (adj.) "short, low, little, shallow," from PIE *mregh-wi-, from root *mregh-u- "short."
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brachy- 
word-forming element meaning "short," from Latinized combining form of Greek brakhys "short," from PIE root *mregh-u- "short."
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typo (n.)
1816, "compositor," short for typographer; 1892 as short for typographical error.
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myope (n.)

"short-sighted person," 1728, from French myope "short-sighted" (16c.), from Late Latin myop-, from Greek myōps "short-sighted" (see myopia).

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breviary (n.)
1540s, "brief statement;" 1610s, "short prayer book used by Catholic priests;" from Latin breviarium "summary," noun use of neuter of adjective breviarius "abridged," from breviare "to shorten, abbreviate," from brevis "short" (from PIE root *mregh-u- "short").
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tech (n.)
1906 as short for technical college (or institute, etc.), American English; 1942 as short for technician.
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hypo (n.)
1711, "depression of the spirits," short for hypochondria; 1904 as short for hypodermic needle.
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amphibrach (n.)
1580s, from Latin amphibrachus, from Greek amphibrakhys, name for a foot consisting of a long syllable between two short, literally "short at both ends," from amphi "on both sides" (see amphi-) + brakhys "short" (from PIE root *mregh-u- "short"). Related: Amphibrachic.
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snub (adj.)
"short and turned up," 1725, in snub-nosed, from snub (v.). The connecting notion is of being "cut short."
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