Etymology
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bodega (n.)

1846, "wine shop," from Mexican Spanish, from Spanish bodega "a wine shop; wine-cellar," from Latin apotheca, from Greek apothēkē "depot, store" (see apothecary). Since 1970s in American English it has come to mean "corner convenience store or grocery," especially in a Spanish-speaking community, but in New York City and some other places used generically. Also a doublet of boutique. Italian cognate bottega entered English c. 1900 as "artist's workshop or studio," especially in Italy.

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tongue-twister (n.)

1875, in reference to an awkward sentence, 1892 of a deliberately difficult-to-say phrase, from tongue (n.) + agent noun from twist (v.). The first one called by the name is "Miss Smith's fish-sauce shop."

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butchery (n.)

mid-15c., bocherie, "the trade of a butcher," from Old French bocherie "slaughter; a butcher's shop" (13c., Modern French boucherie), from bochier "a butcher" (see butcher (n.)). The meaning "barbarous killing" is from mid-15c.

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china (n.)

"porcelain imported from China," 1650s, short for China-ware(1630s), China dishes (1570s), etc.; from the country name (see China). Used of porcelain and porcelain-ware generally. China-shop is attested from 1750.

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showroom (n.)

"room for display of furniture and other goods for sale to attract customers," 1610s, from show (v.) + room (n.). Show-window "window in a shop arranged for the display of goods" is by 1826.

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mom (n.)

"mother," 1867, American English, perhaps a shortening of mommy; also see mamma. Adjectival phrase mom and pop to indicate a small shop or other business run by a married couple is by 1946.

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cleaner (n.)

"one who or that which cleans," mid-15c., agent noun from clean (v.). Meaning "shop that cleans clothes" is from 1873. To take (someone) to the cleaners "get all of (someone's) money" is from 1921.

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slop (n.2)

late 14c., "loose outer garment," perhaps from Old English oferslop "surplice," which seems to be related to Middle Dutch slop, Old Norse sloppr (either of which also might be the source of the Middle English word), perhaps all from Proto-Germanic *slup-, from PIE root *sleubh- "to slide, slip" on the notion of a garment one "slips" on or into (compare sleeve). Sense extended generally to "clothing, ready-made clothing" (1660s), usually in plural slops. Hence, also, slop-shop "shop where ready-made clothes are sold" (1723).

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Chanel 

Paris fashion house, founded by Gabrielle 'Coco' Chanel (1883-1971), French fashion designer and perfumier, who opened her first shop in 1909. The perfume Chanel No. 5 debuted in 1921.

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bakery (n.)

1810, "place for making bread;" see bake (v.) + -ery. Replaced earlier bakehouse (c. 1400). As "shop where baked goods are sold" it was noted as an Americanism by British travelers by 1832.

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