Etymology
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hardship (n.)
c. 1200, "quality of being hard" (obsolete), from hard (adj.) + -ship. Meaning "disadvantage, suffering, privation" is c. 1400.
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admiralship (n.)
"office or position of an admiral," 1610s, from admiral + -ship.
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shipwright (n.)

"builder of ships, ship-carpenter, man whose trade or employment is the construction of ships;" Old English scipwyrhta; see ship (n.) + wright (n.).

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shipyard (n.)

"plot of ground near the water on which ships are constructed," c. 1700, from ship (n.) + yard (n.1).

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shipboard (n.)

also ship-board, "side of a ship," c. 1200, ship-bord, from ship (n.) + board (n.2).

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directorship (n.)

"condition or office of a director," 1720; see director + -ship.

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recordership (n.)

"office of a recorder," 1550s, see recorder (n.1) + -ship.

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craftsmanship (n.)

"skilled mechanical workmanship," 1650s, from craftsman + -ship. Craftmanship is attested from 1839.

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spaceship (n.)
1894, from space (n.) + ship (n.). Spaceship earth is from 1966.
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shipping (n.)

c. 1300, "a ship, means of passing over water;" see ship (n.). The meaning "act of sending (freight) by a ship, etc." is from late 15c. As "ships generally or collectively" it is attested from 1590s.

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