Etymology
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page (v.1)
"to summon or call by name," 1904, from page (n.2), on the notion of "to send a page after" someone. Related: Paged; paging.
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transmissible (adj.)
1640s, from Latin transmiss-, stem of transmittere "send across, carry over" (see transmit) + -ible. Related: Transmissibility.
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aphetic (adj.)

1880, "suggested by the Editor" (OED editor Sir James A.H. Murray) for "gradual and unintentional loss of a short unaccented vowel at the beginning of a word" [OED], as squire from esquire, venture from adventure. With -ic + aphesis (1880), from Greek aphienai "to let go, to send forth," from assimilated form of apo "from" (see apo-) + hienai "to send, throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Compare apheresis.

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moonrace (n.)
also moon race, "national rivalry to be first to send humans to the moon," 1963, from moon (n.) + race (n.1).
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issue (v.)
mid-14c., of water, etc., "to flow out;" of persons, "come or go (out of a place), sally forth," from issue (n.) or else from Old French issu, past participle of issir. Transitive sense of "to send out" is from mid-15c.; specific sense of "to send out authoritatively" is from c. 1600. Meaning "supply (someone with something)" is from 1925. Related: Issued; issuing.
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Siloam 
pool and spring outside Jerusalem (John ix.7), from Late Latin, from New Testament Greek, from Hebrew shiloach, literally "sending forth," from shalach "to send."
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colleague (n.)

"an associate in office, employment, or labor," 1530s, from French collègue (16c.), from Latin collega "partner in office," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + leg-, stem of legare "send as a deputy, send with a commission," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather." So, "one sent or chosen to work with another," or "one chosen at the same time as another."

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frank (v.)
"to free a letter for carriage or an article for publication, to send by public conveyance free of expense," 1708, from shortened form of French affranchir, from a- "to" + franchir "to free" (see franchise (v.)). A British parliamentary privilege from 1660-1840; in U.S. Congress, technically abolished 1873. Related: Franked; franking. As a noun, "signature of one entitled to send letters for free," from 1713.
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forward (v.)
1590s, "to help push forward," from forward (adv.). Meaning "to send (a letter, etc.) on to another destination" is from 1757; later of e-mail. Related: Forwarded; forwarding.
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post (v.3)

"to send through the postal system," 1837, from post (n.3). Earlier, "to travel with relays of horses" (1530s), hence "to ride rapidly" (1560s). Related: Posted; posting.

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