Etymology
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rasher (n.)

in cookery, "thin slice of bacon or ham," 1590s, a word of unknown origin. Perhaps from Middle English rash "to cut," variant of rase "to rub, scrape out, erase." However, early lexicographer John Minsheu explained it in 1627 as a piece "rashly or hastily roasted."

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scapula (n.)

in anatomy, "shoulder blade," 1570s, Modern Latin, from Late Latin scapula "the shoulder," from Latin scapulae (plural) "shoulders, shoulder blades," perhaps originally "spades, shovels," on the notion of similar shape (or of the animal shoulder blades used as scraping tools in primitive times), from PIE *skap-, variant of *skep- "to cut, scrape" (see scabies).

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scrabble (v.)

1530s, "to scrawl; to scribble; make random, unmeaning marks," from Dutch schrabbelen, frequentative of schrabben "to scratch" (ultimately from PIE root *sker- (1) "to cut"). The intransitive meaning "scrape, scratch, or paw with the hands or claws" is from c. 1600; the meaning "to struggle, scramble" is recorded by 1630s, perhaps from or influenced by scramble. Related: Scrabbled; scrabbling.

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Cnidaria (n.)

phylum of stinging invertebrates, 1860, with abstract noun ending -ia + Latinized form of Greek knidē "nettle," from stem of knizein "to scratch scrape," which is of uncertain origin. Beekes compares Lithuanian knìsti "to scratch, itch, tickle," knisù "to grub up;" Latvian knidet "to itch, geminate, creep;" Old Norse hnita "to push against;" Middle Irish cned "wound." Related: Cnidarian.

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fray (v.)
"wear off by rubbing," c. 1400, from Old French fraiier, froiier "to rub against, scrape; thrust against" (also in reference to copulation), from Latin fricare "to rub, rub down" (see friction). Intransitive sense "to ravel out" (of fabric, etc.) is from 1721. The noun meaning "a frayed place in a garment" is from 1620s. Related: Frayed; fraying.
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tabula rasa (n.)

"the mind in its primary state," 1530s, from Latin tabula rasa, literally "scraped tablet," from which writing has been erased, thus ready to be written on again, from tabula (see table (n.)) + rasa, fem. past participle of radere "to scrape away, erase" (see raze (v.)). A loan-translation of Aristotle's pinakis agraphos, literally "unwritten tablet" ("De anima," 7.22).

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rasp (v.)

mid-13c., raspen, "to scrape, abrade by rubbing with a coarsely rough instrument or something like one," from Middle Dutch raspen and from Old French rasper (Modern French râper) "to grate, rasp," which is ultimately from a West Germanic source (compare Old English gehrespan, Old High German hrespan "to rake together") for which see raffle (n.). The vocalic sense is from 1843. Related: Rasped; rasping.

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scab (n.)

mid-13c., in a general sense, "skin disease, 'the itch,' " developed from Old English sceabb (related to scafan "to shave, scrape, scratch") and from its cognate, Old Norse skabb, both from Proto-Germanic *skab- "scratch, shave" (from PIE *(s)kep- "to cut, scrape, hack;" see scabies). Likely reinforced by resemblance of the plural to Latin cognate scabies "scab, itch, mange" (from scabere "to scratch").

The word was extended late 14c. to the patches or ulcerations accompanying the disease, hence the main modern meaning "crust which forms over a wound or sore," attested by c. 1400.

The colloquial meaning "strikebreaker" is recorded by 1806, from earlier colloquial sense of "person who refuses to join a trade union" (1777), probably from meaning "despicable person; mean, paltry fellow" (1580s), which, according to OED, is possibly from Dutch, where a similar sense had developed. The flood-scoured scablands of the Pacific Northwest were so called by 1923.

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rodent (n.)

"a rodent mammal" 1835 (as an adjective 1833), from Modern Latin Rodentia, the order name, from Latin rodentem (nominative rodens), "the gnawers," present participle of rodere "to gnaw, eat away," which is of uncertain etymology, possibly is from an extended form of PIE root *red- "to scrape, scratch, gnaw." Uncertain connection to Old English rætt (see rat (n.)). They are characterized by having no canine teeth and strong incisors.

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gash (n.)
1540s, alteration of Middle English garce "a gash, cut, wound, incision" (early 13c.), from Old North French garser "to scarify, cut, slash" (Old French *garse), apparently from Vulgar Latin *charassare, from Greek kharassein "engrave, sharpen, carve, cut," from PIE *gher- (4) "to scrape, scratch" (see character). Loss of -r- is characteristic (see ass (n.2)). Slang use for "vulva" dates to mid-1700s. Provincial English has a set of words (gashly, gashful, etc.) with forms from gash but senses from gast- "dreadful, frightful."
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