Etymology
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phone (n.2)

"elementary sound of a spoken language, one of the primary elements of utterance," 1866, from Greek phōnē "sound, voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say").

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namely (adv.)

"particularly, especially, expressly" (i.e. "by name"), c. 1200, from name (n.) + -ly (2). From mid-15c. as "that is to say."

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phonic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to sound, acoustic," 1793, from Greek phōnē "sound, voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say") + -ic.

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nigra (n., adj.)

by 1944, American English, reflecting a white Southern U.S. pronunciation of Negro, but it was held to be a compromise made by those whites who had learned to not say nigger but could not bring themselves to say Negro, and it was thus deemed (in the words of a 1960 slang dictionary) "even more derog[atory] than 'nigger.' "

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prefatory (adj.)

"belonging to or serving as a preface, introductory," 1670s, from Latin praefat-, past-participle stem of praefari "to say beforehand" (see preface (n.)) + -ory. Related: Prefatorial; prefatorily.

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needless (adj.)

"not needed, unnecessary," c. 1300, nedeles, from need (n.) + -less. Related: Needlessly. Phrase needless to say or speak is recorded from early 16c.

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i.e. 

abbreviation of Latin id est, literally "that is;" used in English in the sense of "that is to say." Latin id "it" is from PIE pronominal stem *i- (see yon). For est, see is.

i.e. means that is to say, & introduces another way (more comprehensible to the hearer, driving home the speaker's point better, or otherwise preferable) of putting what has been already said; it does not introduce an example, & when substituted for e.g. in that function ... is a blunder. [Fowler]
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quip (v.)

1570s, "use quips; assail with clever, sarcastic remarks," from quip (n.). The sense of "to say or reply as a quip" is by 1950. Related: Quipped; quipping.

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enunciative (adj.)
"declarative, declaring something as true," 1530s, from Latin enunciatus, properly enuntiativus, from past participle stem of enuntiare "to speak out, say, express" (see enunciate).
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moreover (adv.)

"beyond what has been said," late 14c., in phrase and yit more ouer "there is more to say;" from more (adv.) + over (adv.). Written as one word from late 14c.

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