Etymology
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serrate (adj.)

"notched on the edge like a saw," 1660s, from Latin serratus "sawlike, notched like a saw," from serra "a saw" (also a name of a type of serrated battle formation), a word of unknown origin. De Vaan suggests a connection to Latin sario 'to hoe, weed," and a PIE source in *sers- "cutting off." Related: Serrated; serrating.

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runcinate (adj.)

1776, "irregularly saw-toothed," from Modern Latin runcinatus, from Latin runcina "a (carpenter's) plane."

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redan (n.)

type of fortification, 1680s, from French redan, from redent "a double notching" (as of the teeth of a saw), from re- "back, again" (see re-) + dent, from Latin dens "tooth" (from PIE root *dent- "tooth").

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serration (n.)

"condition of being serrated, formation in the shape of the edge of a saw," 1808, noun of state from serrate (v.), for which see serrate (adj.).

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Venezuela 
Spanish, diminutive of Venecia "Venice" (see Venice). Supposedly the name was given by Spanish sailors in 1499 when they saw a native village built on piles on Lake Maracaibo. Related: Venezuelan.
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mandrel (n.)

"miner's pick," 1510s, of unknown origin; perhaps borrowed from French mandrin, itself of unknown origin. Also applied from 17c. to a bar or spindle, used chiefly to hold articles in place, on a lathe or a circular saw.

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teeter (v.)

1843, "to seesaw," alteration of Middle English titter "move unsteadily," probably from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse titra "to shake, shiver, totter, tremble," from Proto-Germanic *ti-tra- (source also of German zittern "to tremble"). Meaning "move unsteadily, be on the edge of imbalance" is from 1844.

Noun teeter-totter "see-saw" is attested from 1871 (earlier simply teeter, 1855, and titter-totter in same sense is from 1520s). Totter (n.) "board swing" is recorded from late 14c.; see totter (v.), and compare see-saw.

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prism (n.)

1560s, in geometry, "a solid whose bases or ends are any similar, equal, and parallel plane polygons, and whose sides are parallelograms" (not always triangular), from Late Latin prisma, from Greek prisma "a geometrical prism, trilateral column," (Euclid), literally "something sawed (as a block of wood), sawdust," from prizein, priein "to saw" (related to prion "a saw"), which is of uncertain origin. Euclid chose the word, apparently, on the image of a column with the sides sawn off.

Specific sense in optics, "an instrument (usually triangular) with well-polished sides of glass, quartz, etc., which refracts light and spreads it in a spectrum," is attested from 1610s.

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fine-toothed (adj.)
c. 1600, "epicurean, having delicate tastes," from fine (adj.) + toothed "having teeth" (of a certain kind); see tooth (n.). By 1703 as "having fine teeth" (of a saw, file, comb, etc.); fine-tooth in this sense attested from 1804.
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Balthazar 
masc. proper name, from French, from Latin, from Greek Baltasar, from Hebrew Belteshatztzar, Biblical king of Babylon (who "saw the writing on the wall"), from Babylonian Balat-shar-usur, literally "save the life of the king." As a type of very large wine bottle by 1935, in allusion to Daniel v.1.
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