Etymology
Advertisement
brine (n.)

Middle English brine "salt water," from Old English bryne "water saturated with salt," cognate with Dutch brijn, Flemish brijne, but all of unknown origin.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
sal (n.)

name for salt formerly much used in pharmacy and old chemistry, late 14c., from Old French sal, from Latin sal (genitive salis) "salt" (from PIE root *sal- "salt"). For sal ammoniac "ammonium chloride" (early 14c.), see ammonia. Sal volatile, "ammonium carbonate," especially as used in reviving persons who have fainted, is by 1650s, Modern Latin, literally "volatile salt" (see volatile).

Related entries & more 
silicate (n.)

"salt of a silicic acid," 1811, from silica + -ate (3).

Related entries & more 
halieutic (adj.)

"pertaining to fishing," 1854, from Latin halieuticus, from Greek halieutikos "pertaining to fishing," from halieuein "to fish," from hals "the sea," literally "salt" (from PIE root *sal- "salt"). Halieutics "writing on the art of fishing" is from 1640s (Latin Halieutica was the title of a poem on fishing by Ovid).

Related entries & more 
sulfite (n.)

salt of sulfurous acid, 1790, from sulfur + -ite (2).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
citrate (n.)

"salt of citric acid," 1794, from French citrate; see citric + -ate (3).

Related entries & more 
chlorate (n.)

"salt of chloric acid," 1823; see chlorine + -ate (3)

Related entries & more 
wrasse (n.)

type of salt-water fish, 1670s, from Cornish wrach, related to Welsh gurach.

Related entries & more 
glutamate (n.)

salt of glutamic acid, 1876, from glutamic acid (see gluten) + -ate (3).

Related entries & more 
desalination (n.)

"removal of salt," 1943, from de- + salination. As a verb, desalt is recorded from 1909; desalinate is from 1949.

Related entries & more 

Page 4