Etymology
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jongleur (n.)
"wandering minstrel of medieval times," 1779, a revival in a technical sense (by modern historians and novelists) of Norman-French jongleur, a variant of Old French jogleor "minstrel, itinerant player; joker, juggler, clown" (12c.), from Latin ioculator "jester, joker" (see juggler).
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these (pron.)
Old English þæs, variant of þas (which became those and took the role of plural of that), nominative and accusative plural of þes, þeos, þis "this" (see this). Differentiation of these and those is from late 13c. OED begins its long entry with the warning, "This word has a complicated history."
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key (adj.)
"crucially important," 1913, from key (n.1). Perhaps from or reinforced by key move, in chess, "first move in a solution to a set problem" (1827), which to an experienced player opens the way to see how the solution will develop.
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walk-on (n.)
"minor non-speaking role," 1902, theatrical slang, from the verbal phrase walk on, attested in theater jargon by 1897 with a sense "appear in crowd scenes," from walk (v.) + on (adv.). Meaning "actor who has such a part" is attested from 1946. The sports team sense is recorded from 1974.
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Hooverville 
1933, American English, from U.S. president Herbert C. Hoover (1874-1964), who was in office when the Depression began, + common place-name ending -ville. Earlier his name was the basis of Hooverize "economize on food" (1917) from his role as wartime head of the U.S. Food Administration.
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down (v.)

1560s, "cause to go down," from down (adv.). Meaning "swallow hastily" is by 1860; football sense of "bring down (an opposing player) by tackling" is attested by 1887. Figurative sense of "defeat, get the better of" is by 1898. Related: Downed; downing.

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ante (n.)
in the game of poker, "stake of money placed in a pool by each player before drawing cards," 1838, American English poker slang, apparently from Latin ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before"). From 1846 as a verb.
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out (n.)

late 15c., "egress," from out (adj). From 1620s, "a being out" (of something), from out (adv.). From 1764 in politics as "the party which is out of office." From 1860 in the baseball sense "act of getting an opposing player out of active play." From 1919 as "means of escape; alibi."

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patzer (n.)

also potzer, "an incompetent chess player," especially one who doesn't know he is, by 1948, of uncertain origin. OED points to German patzen "to bungle," but notes that, though the form looks Yiddish, there doesn't seem to be such a word in Yiddish.

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round robin (n.)
"petition or complaint signed in a circle to disguise the order in which names were affixed and prevent ringleaders from being identified," 1730, originally in reference to sailors and frequently identified as a nautical term. As a kind of tournament in which each player plays the others, it is recorded from 1895.
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