Etymology
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excel (v.)

c. 1400, transitive, "to surpass, be superior to;" early 15c., intransitive, "be remarkable for superiority, surpass others," from Latin excellere "to rise, surpass, be superior, be eminent," from ex "out from" (see ex-) + -cellere "rise high, tower," related to celsus "high, lofty, great," from PIE root *kel- (2) "to be prominent; hill." Related: Excelled; excelling.

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mushroom (v.)

"expand or increase rapidly; rise suddenly in position or rank," 1741, from mushroom (n.). Related: Mushroomed; mushrooming.

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emergence (n.)

1640s, "unforeseen occurrence," from French émergence, from emerger, from Latin emergere "rise up" (see emerge). Meaning "an emerging, process of coming forth" is from 1704.

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peak (v.)

1570s, "to rise in a peak," from peak (n.). Figurative meaning "reach the highest point" is recorded by 1958. Related: peaked; peaking.

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hulk (v.)

"to be clumsy, unwieldy, or lazy," 1789, from hulk (n.) or a back-formation from hulking. Meaning "rise massively" is from 1880. Related: Hulked; hulking.

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mythopoeic (adj.)

"pertaining to the creation of myths, giving rise to myths," 1843, from Greek mythopoios, from mythos (see myth) + poiein "to make, create" (see poet). Related: Mythopoeist.

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emersion (n.)

"reappearance, act of emerging," 1630s, noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin emergere "to rise out or up" (see emerge). Originally of eclipses and occultations.

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keystroke (n.)

1902, from key (n.1) + stroke (n.). Not in common use until the rise of computers. As a verb, by 1966 (implied in keystroking).

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get-up (n.)

also getup, 1847, "equipment, costume," from get (v.) + up (adv.). Meaning "initiative, energy" recorded from 1841. The verbal phrase is recorded from mid-14c. as "to rise."

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surge (n.)

late 15c., "fountain, stream," of uncertain origin, probably from French sourge-, stem of sourdre "to rise, swell," from Latin surgere "to rise, arise, get up, mount up, ascend; attack," contraction of surrigere, from assimilated form of sub "up from below" (see sub-) + regere "to keep straight, guide" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," with derivatives meaning "to direct in a straight line," thus "to lead, rule"). Meaning "high, rolling swell of water" is from 1520s; figurative sense of "excited rising up" (as of feelings) is from 1510s.

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