Etymology
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benzodiazepine (n.)
1934, from benzo-, word-forming element used in chemistry to indicate presence of a benzene ring fused with another ring, + di + azo- + epine, a suffix denoting a seven-membered ring, from Greek hepta (see seven).
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bijou (n.)
"small item of ornamental jewelry," 1660s, from French bijou, which according to OED is probably from Breton bizou "(jeweled) ring," from bez "finger" (compare Cornish bisou "finger-ring," 13c.). Related: Bijouterie.
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teething (n.)
1724, verbal noun from teethe (v.). Teething-ring attested from 1853.
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tinnitus (n.)
1843, from Latin tinnitus "a ringing, jingling," from tinnire "to ring, tinkle" (see tintinnabulation).
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annelid (n.)

"segmented worm," 1834, from French annélide, source of the phylum name Annelida, coined 1801 in Modern Latin by French naturalist J.B.P. Lamarck, from annelés "ringed ones" (from Latin anulus "little ring," a diminutive of anus "ring;" see anus) + Greek eidos "form, shape" (see -oid).

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buckle (n.)

"spiked metal ring for holding a belt, etc.," c. 1300, bukel, from Old French bocle "boss (of a shield)," then "shield," then by further extension "buckle, metal ring," (12c., Modern French boucle), from Latin buccula "cheek strap of a helmet," in Late Latin "boss of a shield," diminutive of bucca "cheek" (see bouche).

Boucle in the middle ages had the double sense of a "shield's boss" and "a ring"; the last sense has alone survived, and it metaph. developed in the boucle de cheveux, ringlets. [Kitchin]
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puzzle (n.)

c. 1600, "state of being puzzled," from puzzle (v.); meaning "perplexing question, difficult problem" is from 1650s; that of "a toy contrived to test one's ingenuity" is from 1814. Puzzle-ring "number of small rings intertwined inseparably with one another that can be arranged as a single ring" is by 1877.

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clasp-hook (n.)

"pair of hooks provided with a ring which can hold them together," 1841, from clasp (n.) + hook (n.).

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anklet (n.)
"ornamental ring for an ankle," 1810, from ankle, with diminutive suffix -let, after bracelet, etc.
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