Etymology
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disallowable (adj.)

"not to be sanctioned or permitted, inadmissible," mid-15c., from dis- "not, reverse of" + allowable.

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unknit (v.)
Old English uncnyttan; see un- (2) "reverse" + knit (v.). Related: Unknitted; unknitting.
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uncover (v.)
early 14c., from un- (2) "reverse of" + cover (v.). Earliest use is figurative; literal sense is attested from late 14c. Related: Uncovered; uncovering.
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unstop (v.)
"remove the stopper from," late 14c., from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + stop (v.). Related: Unstopped; unstopping.
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decondition (v.)

"reverse or remove conditioned reflexes from," 1914, from de- "do the opposite of" + condition (v.). Related: Deconditioned; deconditioning.

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unburden (v.)
1530s, "to unload" (transitive), from un- (2) "reverse of" + burden (v.). Similar formation in German entbürden. Reflexive sense is recorded from 1580s. Related: Unburdened; unburdening.
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unmask (v.)
1580s in figurative sense, c. 1600 in literal sense (transitive and intransitive), from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + mask (v.). Related: Unmasked; unmasking.
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turn-around (n.)
also turnaround, 1936, from verbal phrase turn around "reverse," 1880, American English, from turn (v.) + around (adv.).
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unfit (v.)
"to render unfit," 1610s, from unfit (adj.), or else from un- (2) "reverse of" + fit (v.). Related: Unfitted; unfitting.
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unlade (v.)
"remove the cargo from," Old English onhladen; see un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + lade (v.). Related: Unladen; unlading.
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