Etymology
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rested (adj.)
"refreshed by sleep," c. 1400, past-participle adjective from rest (v.).
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hectare (n.)
1817, from French hectare "a hundred ares," formed from Latinized form of Greek hekaton "a hundred" (see hecatomb) + Latin area "vacant piece of ground" (see area). A superficial measure equal to 100 ares, coined by decree of the French National Convention in 1795.
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quietude (n.)

"rest, repose, quiet, tranquility," 1590s, from French quiétude (c. 1500) or directly from Late Latin quietudo, from Latin quietus "free; calm, resting" (from PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet"). In the same sense quietness is attested from mid-15c.

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requiescat (n.)

a wish or prayer for the repose of the dead, from the Latin phrase requiescat in pace (often abbreviated R.I.P.), literally "may he (or she) begin to rest in peace," with third person singular inceptive (or subjunctive) of requies "rest, repose" (see requiem). The phrase is "frequent in sepulchral inscriptions" [Century Dictionary].

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pillow (v.)

"to rest or place on or as on a pillow," 1620s, from pillow (n.). Related: Pillowed; pillowing.

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microclimate (n.)

"climate of a very small or restricted area," 1918, from micro- + climate. Related: Microclimatology; microclimatological.

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requiem (n.)

"mass for repose of the soul of the dead," c. 1300, from Latin requiem, accusative singular of requies "rest (after labor), repose," from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see re-), + quies "quiet" (from suffixed form of PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet"). It is the first word of the Mass for the Dead in the Latin liturgy: Requiem æternam dona eis, Domine .... ["Rest eternal grant them, O Lord ...."]. By 1610s as "any dirge or solemn chant for repose of the dead."

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still (v.)
Old English stillan "to be still, have rest; to quiet, calm, appease; to stop, restrain," from stille "at rest" (see still (adj.)). Cognate with Old Saxon stillian, Old Norse stilla, Dutch, Old High German, German stillen. Related: Stilled; stilling.
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cloud-burst (n.)

also cloudburst, "violent downpour of much rain over a small area," 1817, American English, from cloud (n.) + burst (n.). It parallels German Wolkenbruch.

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carpet-bombing (n.)
"the dropping of a large number of bombs on an entire area to inflict intense damage," 1945, from carpet (v.) + bomb (v.). Related: Carpet-bomb; carpet-bombed.
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