Etymology
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prefiguration (n.)

"a figuring beforehand, antecedent representation by similitude," late 14c., prefiguracioun, from Late Latin praefigurationem (nominative praefiguratio) "a figuring beforehand," noun of action from past-participle stem of praefigurare "to prefigure" (see prefigure).

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crucifix (n.)

"a cross or representation of a cross with the crucified figure of Christ upon in," early 13c., from Old French crucefix (12c., Modern French crucifix), from Latin cruci fixus "(one) fixed to the cross" (see crucify).

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Chartism (n.)

1839 in English political history, in reference to the reform party active 1836-48, from "The People's Charter," which contained their principles (universal suffrage, abolition of the property qualification for serving in Parliament, equal representation, etc.). Related: Chartist (1838).

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reproduce (v.)

1610s, transitive, "to bring into existence again," from re- "again" + produce (v.), probably on model of French reproduire (16c.). Sense of "make a copy or representation of" is recorded by 1850. The intransitive sense of "generate offspring, procreate" is by 1894. Related: Reproduced; reproducing.

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caricature (n.)

"grotesque or ludicrous representation of persons or things by an absurd exaggeration of what is characteristic," 1748 (figurative), 1750 (literal), from French caricature (18c.), from Italian caricatura "satirical picture; an exaggeration," literally "an overloading," from caricare "to load; exaggerate," from Vulgar Latin *carricare "to load a wagon or cart," from Latin carrus "two-wheeled wagon" (see car). The Italian form had been used in English from 1680s and was common 18c.

A representation, pictorial or descriptive, in which beauties or favorable points are concealed or perverted and peculiarities or defects exaggerated, so as to make the person or thing represented ridiculous, while a general likeness is retained. [Century Dictionary]
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pentangle (n.)

"five-pointed or five-angled figure, a pentagon or pentacle," late 14c., pent-angel, "a representation of a five-pointed star;" see penta- + angle (n.). In some early uses perhaps a corruption of pentacle. Related: Pentangular.

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likeness (n.)
"representation of an object, that which resembles another, a like shape or form," Old English (Northumbrian) licnes "likeness, similarity; figure, statue, image," shortened from gelicness; see like (adj.) + -ness. Similar formation in Old Saxon gelicnass, Dutch gelijkenis, German Gleichnes.
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rendering (n.)

mid-15c., "a giving back, yielding, action of restoring," verbal noun from render (v.). Meaning "a translation, act of translating" is from 1640s; that of "extracting or melting of fat" is from 1792. The visual and dramatic arts sense of "reproduction, representation" is from 1862. The earlier noun was simply render (late 14c.).

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figurine (n.)
"small, ornamental human representation in pottery or other material work," 1854, from French figurine (16c.), from Italian figurina, diminutive of figura, from Latin figura "shape, form, figure" (from PIE root *dheigh- "to form, build"). Figurette is from 1850, from Italian.
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Pieta (n.)

"representation in painting or sculpture of the seated Virgin holding the body of of the dead Christ in her lap," 1640s, from Italian pieta, from Latin pietatem "piety, pity, faithfulness to natural ties" (see piety). Earlier in English pity was used in this sense (early 15c.)

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