Etymology
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remain (v.)

early 15c., remainen, "be left after the removal or loss of a part, number, or quality; survive," from Anglo-French remayn-, Old French remain- (as in il remaint "it remains"), stressed stem of remanoir "to stay, dwell, remain; be left; hold out," from Latin remanere "to remain, to stay behind; be left behind; endure, abide, last" (source also of Old Spanish remaner, Italian rimanere), from re- "back" (see re-) + manere "to stay, remain" (from PIE root *men- (3) "to remain").

Also from early 15c. as "continue" in someone's charge or possession; continue in a certain place or condition." From early 15c. in mathematics. Related: Remained; remaining.

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remand (v.)

mid-15c., remaunden, "to send (something) back," from Anglo-French remaunder, Old French remander "send for again" (12c.) or directly from Late Latin remandare "to send back word, repeat a command," from Latin re- "back" (see re-) + mandare "to consign, order, commit to one's charge" (see mandate (n.)).

The meaning "command or order to go back to a place" is by 1580s. Specifically in law, "send back (a prisoner) on refusing his application for discharge," by 1640s. Related: Remanded; remanding; remandment.

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remind (v.)

1640s, "to remember, recall (something) to one's mind" (a sense now obsolete); 1650s as "put (someone) in mind of (something), bring to the remembrance of;" from re- "again" + mind (v.). A Latin-Germanic hybrid. Related: Reminded; reminding.

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remnant (n.)

"remaining part or quality, that which is left or remains," late 14c., contraction of remenant, remanent, remenaunt (c. 1300) "the remainder," from Old French remanant "rest, remainder, surplus," noun use of present participle of remanoir "to remain" (see remain (v.)).

Specific sense of "end of a piece of ribbon, drapery, cloth, etc." (that which remains after the last cutting of a bolt or web) is recorded from mid-15c. As an adjective, "remaining, left," 1540s. An Old English word for "remnant" was endlaf.

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remonstrance (n.)

late 15c., "an appeal, request," a sense now obsolete, from Old French remonstrance (15c., Modern French remontrance), from Medieval Latin remonstrantia, from present-participle stem of remonstrare "point out, show," from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see re-), + Latin monstrare "to show" (see monster).

The sense of "a strong formal representation of reasons or statement of facts against something complained of or opposed" is from 1620s. Also in history with specific political and ecclesiastical senses. Related: Remonstrant (n., adj.).

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remittance (n.)

1705, "act of transmitting (money, etc.) to another place; sum of money sent;" see remit (v.) + -ance. In the general noun sense of "a remitting," remitment (1610s of offenses; 1670s of money sent); remittal (1590s); remitting (late 15c., in law), and remit (early 15c.) have been used.

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reminiscent (adj.)

1705, "pertaining to or characterized by reminiscence," from Latin reminiscentem (nominative reminiscens), present participle of reminisci "remember, call to mind," from re- "again" (see re-) + minisci "to remember" (from root of mens "mind," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think"). By 1880 as "calling to mind, evoking a reminiscence (of someone or something)." Related: Reminiscential "of the nature of reminiscence" (1640s).

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remanence (n.)

early 15c. (Chauliac), "remaining traces of a disease," from Old French remanence, remenence, related to remanoir "to stay, dwell, remain" (see remain (v.)). By 1660s in the general sense of "that which remains." The meaning "continuance, permanence" is by 1810 (Coleridge).

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remediation (n.)

"action of remedying," now especially in teaching or physical therapy, 1818, noun of action from stem of Latin remediare, from remedium "a cure, remedy" (see remedy (n.)). In educational jargon by 1966; of pollution, by 1986. The latest uses might be fresh coinages from remediate (v.).

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remorseful (adj.)

"characterized by remorse, burdened with a painful sense of guilt and penitence due to consciousness of guilt," 1590s, from remorse + -ful. Related: Remorsefully; remorsefulness.

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