Etymology
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nonconforming (adj.)

also non-conforming, "failing or refusing to conform," 1640s, from non- + conforming (see conform). Originally in religion, "refusing to follow the forms and regulations of the Church of England;" see nonconformist.

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conformist (n.)

"one who conforms" in any way, 1630s, from conform + -ist. Compare conformism. Originally usually with reference to religion, "one who complies with the form of worship of the Church of England."

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mufti (n.1)

1580s, muphtie "official head of the state religion in Turkey," from Arabic mufti "judge," active participle (with formative prefix mu-) of afta "to give," conjugated form of fata "he gave a (legal) decision" (compare fatwa).

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conformism (n.)
1890, "tendency or need to conform" to some group standard, from conform + -ism. In religion, from c. 1902. In geology from c. 1912. Modern, general sociological sense (social conformism) popularized from c. 1948.
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hypocrite (n.)

c. 1200, ypocrite, "false pretender to virtue or religion," from Old French ypocrite (12c., Modern French hypocrite), from Church Latin hypocrita "a hypocrite," from Greek hypokritēs "stage actor; pretender, dissembler," from hypokrinesthai (see hypocrisy).

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nullifidian (n.)

"one of no faith or religion," 1560s, from Latin nulli-, combining form of nullus "no" (see null) + fides "faith" (from PIE root *bheidh- "to trust, confide, persuade"). As an adjective from 1620s.

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believer (n.)
1540s, "one who has faith in religion," agent noun from believe. From c. 1600 as "one who gives credence (to anything) without personal knowledge, one firmly persuaded of the truth of something."
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pharisaic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the Pharisees," hence "of or pertaining to observance of the external forms and ceremonies of religion without regard to its spirit or essence," 1610s, from Church Latin pharisaicus, from Greek pharisaikos, from pharisaios (see Pharisee). Related: Pharisaical (1530s).

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sect (n.)
mid-14c., "distinctive system of beliefs or observances; party or school within a religion," from Old French secte, sete "sect, religious community," or directly from Late Latin secta "religious group, sect in philosophy or religion," from Latin secta "manner, mode, following, school of thought," literally "a way, road, beaten path," from fem. of sectus, variant past participle of sequi "follow," from PIE root *sekw- (1) "to follow." Confused in this sense with Latin secta, fem. past participle of secare "to cut" (from PIE root *sek- "to cut"). Meaning "separately organized religious body" is recorded from 1570s.
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emancipator (n.)

"one who liberates from bondage or restraint," 1782, agent noun in Latin form from emancipate. Emancipationist "one who favors emancipation" in any sense is from 1810 (originally in reference to religion in Ireland).

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