Etymology
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courtship (n.)

1570s, "behavior of a courtier," from court (n.) + -ship. Meaning "the wooing of a woman, attention paid by a man to a woman with intention of winning her affection and ultimately her consent to marriage" is from 1590s. By 1830s it was used of a period during which a couple mutually develops a romantic relationship with a view to marriage.

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parentage (n.)

late 15c., "parental conduct, parental relationship exhibited in the recognition and care of children," from Old French parentage (12c.), from parent (see parent (n.)). Meaning "descent or derivation from parents, lineage" is from 1560s; figurative use from 1580s. An earlier word was parage "descent, lineage; family," late 13c., from Old French.

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classic (n.)

"a Greek or Roman writer or work," 1711, from classic (adj.). So, by mid-18c., any work or author in any context held to have a similar quality or relationship; an artist or literary production of the first rank. In classical Latin the noun use of classicus meant "a marine" (miles classicus) from the "military division" sense of classis.

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gemeinschaft (n.)

1913, as a German word in English (the article suggests "Parish Brotherhoods" as a translation of German Gemeinschaften), from German Gemeinschaft "social relationship based on affection or kinship" (contrasted with gesellschaft), from gemein "common, general" (see mean (adj.1)) + -schaft (see -ship).

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mood (n.2)

"grammatical form indicating the function of a verb," 1570s, an alteration of mode (n.1). The grammatical and musical (1590s) usages of it influenced the meaning of mood (n.1) in such phrases as light-hearted mood, but it is worth remembering that the two moods have no etymological relationship. Also used in traditional logic (1560s) as a variant of mode.

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ecology (n.)
Origin and meaning of ecology

1873, oecology, "branch of science dealing with the relationship of living things to their environments," coined in German by German zoologist Ernst Haeckel as Ökologie, from Greek oikos "house, dwelling place, habitation" (from PIE root *weik- (1) "clan") + -logia "study of" (see -logy). In use with reference to anti-pollution activities from 1960s.

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affiliation (n.)

1751, "adoption," from French affiliation, from Medieval Latin affiliationem (nominative affiliatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin affiliare "to adopt as a son," from ad "to" (see ad-) + filius "son" (see filial).

The figurative sense of "adoption by a society," in reference to a local chapter or branch, is recorded by 1799 (the verb affiliate in a related sense is from 1761). The meaning "friendship, relationship, association" is by 1852.

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knitting (n.)

late 14c., "a fastening with a rope or thread;" mid-15c., "a joining or binding together," verbal noun from knit (v.). In Middle English also "unity; a bond, unifying force; interconnection; a relationship," but these are lost. Meaning "act of weaving a continuous thread by loops or knots" is from 1711. Meaning "knitted work, work done by a knitter" is from 1848. Knitting-needle is from 1590s.

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assonance (n.)

1727, "resemblance of sounds between words other than rhyme," from French assonance, from assonant, from Latin assonantem (nominative assonans), present participle of assonare/adsonare "to resound, respond," from ad "to" (see ad-) + sonare "to sound" (from PIE root *swen- "to sound").

The more specific sense in prosody of "rhyming or correspondence of accented vowels but not consonants" is from 1823. In 20c. the sense tended to merge with consonance in the notion of slant rhyme, off rhyme, but properly there is a distinction.

Assonance is the relationship between words with different consonants immediately preceding and following the last accented vowels, which vowels have identical sounds (hit/will, disturb/bird, absolute/unglued). Consonance is the relationship between words whose final accented vowel sounds are different but with the same consonant frame (truck/trick, billion/bullion, impelling/compiling, trance/trounce). [Miller Williams, "Patterns of Poetry"]
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liege (n.)

late 14c., "vassal of a feudal lord," also "a feudal sovereign, a liege-lord," probably from liege (adj.)) or from a noun use of the adjective in Old French or Anglo-French. A fully reciprocal relationship, so the adjective could apply to either party. Old French distinguished them as lige seignur "liege-lord" and home lige "liege-man."

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