Etymology
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arrhythmic (adj.)
"without rhythm," 1844 (arhythmic), in relation to musical sensibility, Modern Latin, from Greek arrhythmos "irregular, unrhythmical, without measure," from a- "not" (see a- (3)) + rhythmos "measured flow or movement, rhythm; proportion, symmetry" (see rhythm). Related: Arrhythmically.
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dhow (n.)

"single-masted native vessel used on Arabian Sea," later widely applied to all Arab vessels, 1799, original language and meaning unknown. Klein suggests a relation to Persian dav "running."

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correlate (v.)

1742, "to be reciprocally related" (intransitive), back-formation from correlation, or else a verbal use of the noun. Transitive sense of "to place in reciprocal relation" is by 1849. Related: Correlated; correlating; correlative.

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bleb (n.)
c. 1600, "blister or swelling," imitative. Also used for "bubble" (1640s), "protuberance on a cell surface" (1962). Compare blob. "In relation to blob, bleb expresses a smaller swelling" [OED].
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relative (adj.)

early 15c., relatif, "having reference (to something), relating, depending upon," from Old French relatif and directly from Late Latin relativus "having reference or relation," from Latin relatus, used as past participle of referre "bring back, bear back" (see refer), from re- "back, again" + lātus "borne, carried" (see oblate (n.)).

Meaning "having mutual relationship, connected with each other" is from 1590s; that of "arising from or determined by relationship to something else" is from 1610s; that of "having or standing in a relation to something else" is from 1650s; that of "not absolute or existing by itself" is by 1704. In grammar, "referring to an antecedent," from 1520s.

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anthropology (n.)
"science of the natural history of man," 1590s, originally especially of the relation between physiology and psychology, from Modern Latin anthropologia or coined independently in English from anthropo- + -logy. In Aristotle, anthropologos is used literally, as "speaking of man." Related: Anthropologic; anthropological.
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incumbent (adj.)
1560s, in relation to duties or obligations, from Medieval Latin incumbentem (nominative incumbens), present participle of incumbere (see incumbent (n.)). The literal, physical sense "lying or resting on something" is rare in English and first attested 1620s.
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disestablish (v.)

"deprive of the character of being established," 1590s, especially, of a church, "withdraw from exclusive state recognition or privileges" (1832), from dis- + establish. Related: Disestablishment "act of withdrawing (a church) from a privileged relation to the state" (1747; in a non-specific sense, of laws, from 1734); disestablishmentarian (1874).

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compere (n.)

1738, from French compère "a godfather" in relation to the godmother or biological father, hence, as a friendly greeting, "friend, fellow," from Old French compere (13c.), from Medieval Latin compater (see compadre, and compare compeer, gossip). In vaudeville and other entertainment, "master of ceremonies, organizer of a show" (1914).

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paternity (n.)

mid-15c., paternite, "condition of being a father, relation of a father to a child or of God to mankind," from Old French paternité (12c.), from Late Latin paternitatem (nominative paternitas) "fatherly care, fatherhood," from Latin paternus "of a father," from pater (see father (n.)). Meaning "paternal origin, derivation from a father" is from 1868.

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