Etymology
Advertisement
*tere- (2)

*terə- Proto-Indo-European root meaning "cross over, pass through, overcome."

It forms all or part of: avatar; caravanserai; nectar; nectarine; nostril; seraglio; thrill; thorough; through; tranche; trans-; transient; transom; trench; truculent; truncate; trunk.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit tirah, Avestan taro "through, beyond;" Latin trans "beyond;" Old Irish tre, Welsh tra "through;" Old English þurh "through."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
percutaneous (adj.)

"passed, done, or effected through the skin," 1862, with -ous  + Latin per cutem "through the skin," from per "through" (see per) + cutem, accusative singular of cutis "skin" (from PIE root *(s)keu- "to cover, conceal"). Related: Percutaneously.

Related entries & more 
perspicacious (adj.)

"sharp-sighted," also "of acute mental discernment," 1630s, formed as an adjective to perspicacity, from Latin perspicax "sharp-sighted, having the power of seeing through; acute," from perspicere "look through, look closely at," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + specere "look at" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Related: Perspicaciously; perspicaciousness.

Related entries & more 
thoroughfare (n.)

late 14c., "passage or way through," from thorough (before it had differentiated from through) + fare (n.).

Related entries & more 
pierce (v.)

c. 1300 (c. 1200 as a surname), percen, "make a hole in; force one's way through; thrust through with or as with a sharp or pointed instrument," from Anglo-French perser, Old French percier "pierce, transfix, drive through" (12c., Modern French percer), probably from Vulgar Latin *pertusiare, frequentative of Latin pertusus, past participle of pertundere "to thrust or bore through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + tundere "to beat, pound," from PIE *tund-, from root *(s)teu- "to push, strike, knock, beat, thrust" (see obtuse). Related: Pierced; piercing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
permeable (adj.)

early 15c., "passable" (of an area); "penetrable" (of a building)," from Late Latin permeabilis "that can be passed through, passable," from Latin permeare "to pass through, go over," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + meare "to pass," from PIE root *mei- (1) "to change, go, move." Meaning "capable of being passed through without rupture or displacement" is from 1773, especially of substances permitting the passage of fluids. Related: Permeably.

Related entries & more 
embodiment (n.)

"investment in or manifestation through a physical body; a bringing into or presentation in or through a form," 1824, from embody + -ment.

Related entries & more 
perforation (n.)

early 15c., perforacioun, "hole made through something;" mid-15c., "action of boring or piercing," from Medieval Latin perforationem (nominative perforatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin perforare "bore or pierce through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + forare "to pierce" (from PIE root *bhorh- "hole").

Related entries & more 
pervasive (adj.)

tending or having the power to pervade," "1750, with -ive + Latin pervas-, past-participle stem of pervadere "spread or go through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + vadere "to go" (see vamoose). Related: Pervasively; pervasiveness.

Related entries & more 
pervious (adj.)

"capable of being penetrated or permeated by something else, accessible, permeable," 1610s, originally figurative (literal sense is from 1630s), from Latin pervius "that may be passed through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + via "road" (see via (adv.)). Related: Perviousness.

Related entries & more 

Page 4