Etymology
Advertisement
once-over (n.)

"glance, rapid inspection," 1913, American English, from once + over.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
going-over (n.)

1872 as "scolding;" 1919 as "inspection;" from verbal phrase; see going + over (adv.).

Related entries & more 
change-over (n.)

"alteration from one system to another," 1907, from the verbal phrase; see change (v.) + over (adv.).

Related entries & more 
half seas over (adj.)

slang for "drunk," 1736, sometimes said to be from notion of a ship heavy-laden and so low in the water that small waves (half seas) wash over the deck. This suits the sense, but the phrase is not recorded in this alleged literal sense. Half seas over "halfway across the sea" is recorded from 1550s, however, and it was given a figurative extension to "halfway through a matter" by 1690s. What drunkenness is halfway to is not clear.

Related entries & more 
head over heels (adv.)

1726, "a curious perversion" [Weekley] of Middle English heels over head (late 14c.) "somersault fashion," hence "recklessly." Head (n.) and heels long have been paired in alliterative phrases in English, and the whole image also was in classical Latin (per caput pedesque ire).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
transpose (v.)

late 14c., from Old French transposer "transfer, remove; present, render symbolically" (14c.), from Latin transponere (past participle transpositus) "to place over, set over," from trans "across, beyond; over" (see trans-) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). Form altered in French on model of poser "to put, place." Sense of "put music in a different key" is from c. 1600. Related: Transposed; transposing.

Related entries & more 
overburden (v.)

also over-burden, "to put too much weight on, load with too great a burden," 1530s, from over- + burden (v.). Earliest uses are figurative. Related: Overburdened; overburdening.

Related entries & more 
leaf (v.)

"to turn over (the pages of a book)," 1660s, from leaf (n.). Meaning "put forth leaves or foliage" is from 1610s. Related: Leafed; leaved; leafing.

Related entries & more 
superposition (n.)

1650s, from French superposition, from Late Latin superpositionem (nominative superpositio) "a placing over," noun of action from past participle stem of superponere "to place over," from super (see super-) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)).

Related entries & more 
superimpose (v.)

1787, back-formation from superimposition (1680s), or from super- + impose. Compare Latin superimponere "to put upon, place over, place above." Related: Superimposed; superimposing.

Related entries & more 

Page 4