Etymology
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detract (v.)

early 15c., detracten, "disparage, defame, slander," from Latin detractus, past participle of detrahere "to take down, pull down, disparage," from de "down" (see de-) + trahere "to pull" (see tract (n.1)). Literal sense of "take away, withdraw" (c. 1500) is rare in English. Related: Detracted; detracting.

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tousle (v.)

"pull roughly, disorder, dishevel," mid-15c., frequentative of -tousen "handle or push about roughly," probably from an unrecorded Old English *tusian, from Proto-Germanic *tus- (source also of Frisian tusen, Old High German erzusen, German zausen "to tug, pull, dishevel"); related to tease (v.). Related: Tousled; tousling.

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traction (n.)

early 15c., "a drawing or pulling" (originally the pulling of a dislocated limb to reposition it), from Medieval Latin tractionem (nominative tractio) "a drawing" (mid-13c.), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)). Sense of "friction between a wheel and the surface it moves upon" first appears 1825. In modern medical care, "a sustained pull to a part of the body to hold fractured bones in position," 1885.

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pushmi-pullyu (n.)

fictional two-headed mammal from "Dr. Dolittle" (1922), coined by Hugh Lofting from the expressions push me, pull you. Popularized by the 1967 film version of the book.

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trichotillomania (n.)

1905, from French trichotillomanie (1889), from tricho-, Latinized form of Greek trikho-, combining form of thrix (genitive trikhos) "hair" + Greek tillesthai "to pull out" + mania.

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pervade (v.)

"to pass or flow through; to extend or diffuse (itself) throughout," 1650s, from Latin pervadere "spread or go through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + vadere "to go" (see vamoose). Related: Pervaded; pervading; pervasion.

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separative 

"tending to separate," 1590s, from French séparatif (16c.), from Late Latin separativus "pertaining to separation," from Latin separare "to pull apart" (see separate (v.)).

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weakfish (n.)

1838, from Dutch weekvisch, from week "soft" (see weak). So called because it does not pull hard when hooked.

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impervious (adj.)

1640s, from Latin impervius "not to be traverse, that cannot be passed through, impassible," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + pervius "letting things through, that can be passed through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + via "road" (see via (adv.)). Related: Imperviously; imperviousness.

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permeant (adj.)

"passing through," 1640s, from Latin permeantem (nominative permeans), present participle of permeare "to pass through" (see permeable).

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