Etymology
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ambivert (n.)

"person exhibiting features of an extrovert and an introvert," coined by Kimball Young in "Source Book for Social Psychology" (1927), from ambi- "about, around" + -vert (as in earlier introvert), which is ultimately from Latin vertere "to turn" (see versus). Related: Ambiversion.

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ambisexual (adj.)
"unisex" (of clothing), also "bisexual," 1912 in the jargon of psychology, from ambi- + sexual. Ambosexous (1650s) and ambosexual (1935) both were used in the sense "hermaphrodite." Ambisextrous is recorded from 1929 as a humorous coinage based on ambidextrous.
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extraverted (adj.)
in modern psychology, 1915, a variant of extroverted (see extrovert). Related: Extravert (n.), for which also see extrovert. There was a verb extravert in mid- to late 17c. meaning "to turn outward so as to be visible," from Latin extra "outward" + vertere "to turn."
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construct (n.)

1871 in linguistics, "group of words forming a phrase;" 1890 in psychology, "object in the mind formed by sense-impressions" (C.L. Morgan); 1933 in the general sense of "anything constructed;" from construct (v.) or a derived adjective, with altered pronunciation to distinguish noun from verb (as with produce, detail, project, compress, etc.).

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proactive (adj.)

also pro-active, of persons or policies, as an opposition to reactive, "taking the initiative in a situation, anticipating events" as opposed to responding to them, 1921, from pro- + active. From 1933, in psychology (learning theory). Related: Proactively; proactiveness; proactivity.

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extroversion (n.)
mid-17c., "condition of being turned inside out," noun of action from obsolete verb extrovert (v.) "to turn inside out," from extro- + Latin vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend"). Earliest as a word in mysticism; modern use in psychology attested by 1920.
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anthropology (n.)

"science of the natural history of man," 1590s, originally especially of the relation between physiology and psychology, from Modern Latin anthropologia or coined independently in English from anthropo- + -logy. In Aristotle, anthrōpologos is used literally, as "speaking of man." Related: Anthropologic; anthropological.

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-phobia 

word-forming element meaning "excessive or irrational fear, horror, or aversion," from Latin -phobia and directly from Greek -phobia "panic fear of," from phobos "fear" (see phobia). In widespread popular use with native words from c. 1800. In psychology, "an abnormal or irrational fear." Related: -phobic.

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aversion (n.)
Origin and meaning of aversion

1590s, "a turning away from;" 1650s in the figurative sense of "mental attitude of repugnance or opposition," from French aversion (16c.) and directly from Latin aversionem (nominative aversio), noun of action from past-participle stem of aversus "turned away, backwards, behind, hostile," itself past participle of avertere "to turn away" (see avert). Aversion therapy in psychology is from 1946.

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reductive (adj.)

1630s, "that reduces; having the property, power, or effect of reducing;" 1650s, "that leads or brings back" (now especially in psychology), from Medieval Latin reductivus, from reduct-, past participle stem of Latin reducere "lead back, bring back," figuratively "restore, replace" (see reduce). Related: Reductively.

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