Etymology
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conventionality (n.)

1834, "conventional thing or practice;" 1842, "conventional quality or state;" see conventional + -ity. Related: Conventionalities.

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dyeing (n.)

"the operation or practice of fixing colors in solution in textiles, hides, hair, etc.," late 14c., verbal noun from dye (v.).

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cookery (n.)

"art or practice of cooking and dressing food for the table," late 14c.; see cook (n.) + -ery.

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athletics (n.)

"art or practice of athletic games or exercises," c. 1730, from athletic; also see -ics. Probably formed on the model of gymnastics.

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waterboard (n.)

1610s (n.), "gutter," from water (n.1) + board (n.1). Waterboarding as the name of a type of torture is from 2005, but the practice is older.

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hermetically (adv.)

c. 1600, "according to hermetic practice," especially, chemically, "by means of fusion," from hermetical (see hermetic) + -ly (2).

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quackery (n.)

"the boastful pretensions or knavish practice of a quack, particularly in medicine" [Century Dictionary], 1690s, from quack (n.1) + -ery.

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bicycling (n.)

"art or practice of riding on a bicycle," 1869, verbal noun from bicycle (v.), for which see bicycle (n.).

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authoritarianism (n.)

"the practice, system, doctrines, etc. of authoritarians," 1883; see authoritarian + -ism. Early use was mostly in communist jargon.

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ure (n.)

"effect, operation, practice," early 15c., from Old French uevre (13c., Modern French oeuvre), from Latin opera (see opera).

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