Etymology
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outfield (n.)

1630s, "outlying land of a farm" (especially in Scotland), from out- + field (n.); sporting sense is attested from 1851 in cricket, 1868 in baseball, "part of the field most remote from the batsman/batter." Related: Outfielder.

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harvester (n.)
"a reaper," 1590s; agent noun from harvest (v.). Meaning "machine for reaping and binding field crops" is from 1847.
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stavesacre (n.)
herbal plant of the Delphinium family, c. 1400, from Latin staphisagria, from Greek staphis agria, literally "wild raisin," from staphis "raisin" (according to Klein, probably related to staphyle "bunch of grapes") + agria, fem. of agrios "wild," literally "living in the fields," from agros "field" (from PIE root *agro- "field").
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ferromagnetic (adj.)
"behaving like iron in a magnetic field," 1840, from ferro- "iron" + magnetic.
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Aceldama 

late 14c., name of the potter's field near Jerusalem that was purchased with the money Judas Iscariot took to betray Jesus, literally "place of bloodshed," from Greek Akeldama, rendering an Aramaic (Semitic) name akin to Syriac haqal dema "the field of blood." So called for being purchased with the blood-money.

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agriculture (n.)
mid-15c., "tillage, cultivation of large areas of land to provide food," from Late Latin agricultura "cultivation of the land," a contraction of agri cultura "cultivation of land," from agri, genitive of ager "a field" (from PIE root *agro- "field") + cultura "cultivation" (see culture (n.)). In Old English, the idea could be expressed by eorðtilþ.
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agrarian (adj.)

1610s, "relating to the land," from French agrarienne, from Latin agrarius "of the land," from ager (genitive agri) "a field" (from PIE root *agro- "field"). The specialized meaning "having to do with cultivated land" is recorded by 1792. Originally, and often subsequently, "pertaining to the division or sharing of landed property," which was the Roman sense. Earlier in English as agrarie (1530s), from Latin agraria.

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brownfield (n.)
abandoned or disused industrial land, often contaminated to some degree, 1992, American English, from brown (adj.) + field (n.).
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Verona 
city in northern Italy, Celtic Vernomago, from verno "elder tree" + mago "field, place." Related: Veronese.
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Carmel 
mountain in northern Israel, from Latin Carmel, from Greek Karmel, from Hebrew karmel "garden, fertile field."
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