Etymology
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transplant (v.)

mid-15c., from Late Latin transplantare "plant again in a different place," from Latin trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + plantare "to plant" (see plant (n.)). Extended to people (1550s) and then to organs or tissue (1786). Related: Transplanted; transplanting. An earlier verb was overplaunten "to transplant" (a tree), late 14c.

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-phyte 

word-forming element meaning "plant, plant characteristic; planting, growth; abnormal growth," from Greek phyton "plant," literally "that which has grown," from phyein "to bring forth, make grow," from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow."

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cross-pollination (n.)

"transfer of pollen from the male reproductive organ of one plant to the female reproductive organ of another plant," 1880, from cross- + pollination.

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aerophyte (n.)

"plant which lives exclusively on air," 1838, perhaps via French aerophyte, from aero- "air" + -phyte "plant."

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trifid (adj.)

"divided into three lobes," 1620s, from Latin trifidus "cleft in three," from tri- "three" (see tri-) + -fid. This adjective probably inspired triffid, the name of the three-legged walking poisonous plants in John Wyndham's novel "The Day of the Triffids" (1951).

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wort (n.)

"a plant," Old English wyrt "root, herb, vegetable, plant, spice," from Proto-Germanic *wurtiz (source also of Old Saxon wurt, Old Norse, Danish urt, Old High German wurz "plant, herb," German Wurz, Gothic waurts, Old Norse rot "root"), from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root." St. John's wort attested from 15c.

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xerophyte (n.)

1897, from xero- + Greek phyton "a plant" (see phyto-).

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narcissus (n.)

type of bulbous flowering plant, 1540s, from Latin narcissus, from Greek narkissos, a plant name, not the modern narcissus, possibly a type of iris or lily, associated with Greek narkē "numbness" (see narcotic (n.)) because of the sedative effect of the alkaloids in the plant, but Beekes considers this folk-etymology and writes that "The suffix clearly points to a Pre-Greek word."

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detoxify (v.)

1905, "remove poisonous qualities from;" see de- + toxic + -fy. Earlier in the same sense was detoxicate (1867). Of persons, "treat to remove the effects of alcohol or drugs as a step to ending addiction," by 1970. Related: Detoxified; detoxifying.

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potation (n.)

"an occasion of drinking" (especially alcoholic beverages); "a liquor or potion drunk, concoction, medical drink," early 15c., potacioun, from Old French potacion, from Latin potationem (nom. potatio) "a drinking; poisonous drink, potion," noun of action from past participle stem of potare "to drink" (from PIE root *po(i)- "to drink").

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