Etymology
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pentacle (n.)

1590s, "mathematical figure (presumably originally one of five points) used in magical ceremonies and considered a defense against demons," from Medieval Latin pentaculum "pentagram," a hybrid coined from Greek pente "five" (from PIE root *penkwe- "five") + Latin -culum, diminutive (or instrumental) suffix. OED notes other similar words: Italian had pentacolo "anything with five points," and French pentacle (16c.) was the name of something used in necromancy, perhaps a five-branched candlestick; French had pentacol "amulet worn around the neck" (14c.), from pend- "to hang" + a "to" + col "neck." The same figure as a pentagram, except in magical usage, where it has been extended to other symbols of power, including a six-point star. Related: Pentacular.

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catenary (adj.)

"relating to a chain, like a chain or rope hanging freely from two fixed points," 1872, from Latin catenarius "relating to a chain," from catenanus "chained, fettered," from catena "chain, fetter, shackle" (see chain (n.)). As a noun in mathematics, "catenary curve," from 1788. Related: Catenarian.

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chain-saw (n.)

also chain saw, chainsaw; 1818 as a surgical apparatus (for amputations) consisting of a chain, the links of which have serated edges; 1835 in the saw mill sense, "power-driven saw consisting of a chain with cutting points attached to the links;" from chain (n.) + saw (n.).

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festoon (n.)

"string or chain of flowers, ribbon, or other material suspended between two points," 1620s, from French feston (16c.), from Italian festone, literally "a festive ornament," apparently from festa "celebration, feast," from Vulgar Latin *festa (see feast (n.)). The verb is attested from 1789. Related: Festooned.

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patzer (n.)

also potzer, "an incompetent chess player," especially one who doesn't know he is, by 1948, of uncertain origin. OED points to German patzen "to bungle," but notes that, though the form looks Yiddish, there doesn't seem to be such a word in Yiddish.

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hoyden (n.)

"ill-bred, boisterous young female," 1670s; earlier "rude, boorish fellow" (1590s), of uncertain origin; perhaps from Dutch heiden "rustic, uncivilized man," from Middle Dutch heiden "heathen," from Proto-Germanic *haithinaz- (see heathen). OED points to Elizabethan hoit "indulge in riotous and noisy mirth" in Nares.

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polyaesthesia (n.)

"production, by stimulation of a single point on the skin, of a sensation as if two or more points were stimulated," especially as observed in tabes dorsualis, 1888, Modern Latin, from Greek poly- "many" (see poly-) + aisthēsis "feeling" (from PIE root *au- "to perceive").

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diametrically (adv.)

1630s, "completely, in an extreme degree" (with opposed, contrary, etc.), from diametrical (see diametric + -al (1)) + -ly (2). Originally and mostly in figurative use: the two points that mark the ends of a line of diameter are opposite one another. Diametrical opposition translates Aristotle's phrase for "extreme opposition."

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APB 

also a.p.b., "general alarm," 1960, police jargon initialism (acronym) for all-points bulletin, itself attested by 1953 (perhaps more in detective novels than in actual police use). The notion is "information of general importance," broadcast to all who can hear it.

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pointer (n.)

mid-14c., "a tiler" (early 13c. as a surname), agent noun from point (v.). From c. 1500 as "maker of needlepoint lace." From 1570s as "thing that points;" meaning "dog that stands rigid in the presence of game, facing the quarry" is recorded from 1717. Meaning "item of advice" is recorded by 1883.

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