Etymology
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plane (n.1)

"flat surface, simplest of all geometrical surfaces," c. 1600, from Latin planum "flat surface, plane, level, plain," noun use of neuter of adjective planus "flat, level, even, plain, clear," from PIE *pla-no- (source also of Lithuanian plonas "thin;" Celtic *lanon "plain;" perhaps also Greek pelanos "sacrificial cake, a mixture offered to the gods, offering (of meal, honey, and oil) poured or spread"), suffixed form of root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread."

Introduced (perhaps by influence of French plan in this sense) to differentiate the geometrical senses from plain, which in mid-16c. English also meant "geometric plane." The figurative sense, in reference to inanimate things, is attested from 1850.

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explainable (adj.)

"capable of being explained or made plain," c. 1600, from explain + -able.

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Flanders 
from a source akin to Dutch Vlaanderen probably a compound of roots represented by Flemish vlakte "plain" + wanderen "to wander."
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narrow-minded (adj.)

also narrowminded, "bigoted, illiberal, of confined views or sentiments," 1620s, from narrow (adj.) + -minded. Related: Narrow-mindedness. Middle English had narrow-hearted "mean, ungenerous, ignoble" (c. 1200).

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hiragana (n.)
cursive form of Japanese writing, 1822, from Japanese hiragana, from hira "plain" + kana "borrowed letter(s)."
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llano (n.)

1610s, American Spanish, "prairie; treeless, level plain," especially that of South America north of the Amazon, from noun use of Spanish llano "plain, even, level, smooth," ultimately from Latin planus "smooth, flat, level" (from PIE root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread"). Hence llanero "Latin-American cowboy" (1819), literally "plainsman."

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inhumane (adj.)
originally a variant spelling and pronunciation of inhuman "cruel, hard-hearted;" it appears to have died out 17c. but returned c. 1822, probably a reformation as a negative of humane (q.v.), with its accent.
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single-minded (adj.)
1570s, "sincere, honest" (a sense also in single-hearted); meaning "having a single aim or purpose" is from 1860. See single (adj.) + -minded. Related: Single-mindedly; single-mindedness.
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Milan 
city in northern Italy, Roman Mediolanum, from Gaulish medios "middle" + lanu "plain," in reference to its situation in the Po Valley. Related: Milanese.
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pusillanimity (n.)

late 14c., pusillanimite, "timidity, faint-heartedness, lack of the spirit of courage or fortitude," from Old French pusillanimité (14c.) and directly from Church Latin pusillanimitatem (nominative pusillanimitas) "faint-heartedness," from Latin pusillanimis "faint-hearted, having little courage" (see pusillanimous).

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