Etymology
Advertisement
jigsaw (n.)

also jig-saw, vertical reciprocating saw, 1855, American English, from jig with its notion of "rapid up-and-down motion" + saw (n.1). It was largely displaced by the later band-saws. Jigsaw puzzle first recorded 1906; originally one with pieces cut by a jigsaw. Earlier was dissected map (or picture), 1807, "map or picture mounted on board and divided into more or less irregular parts, to be joined together as a puzzle."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
chiaroscuro (n.)

1680s, "disposition of light and dark in a picture," literally "bright-dark," from Italian chiaro "clear, bright" (from Latin clarus; see clear (adj.)) + oscuro (from Latin obscurus; see obscure (adj.)). Related: Chiaroscurist.

Related entries & more 
rerelease (v.)

also re-release, "to release (a motion picture, song, record, etc.) again or anew," by 1948, from re- "again" + release (v.). Related: Rereleased; rereleasing. Also as a noun, "a new release."

Related entries & more 
marionette (n.)

"a puppet worked by strings," c. 1620, literally "little little Mary," from French marionette (16c.), diminutive of Old French mariole "figurine, idol, picture of the Virgin Mary," itself a diminutive of Marie (see Mary). For ending, see -ette.

Related entries & more 
imaginative (adj.)

late 14c., ymaginatyf, "pertaining to imagination; forming images, given to imagining," from Old French imaginatif and directly from Medieval Latin imaginativus, from imaginat-, stem of Latin imaginari "picture to oneself" (see imagine). Meaning "resulting from imagination" is from 1829. Related: Imaginatively; imaginativeness.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
mat (n.2)

"sheet of backing material," 1845, from French mat "dull surface or finish" (15c.), noun use of Old French mat (adj.) "dull, beaten down," for which see mat (adj.). The word has been confused with mat (n.1), especially as the latter was used late 19c. for "piece of thick paper or other material placed for ornament or protection immediately under the glass of a picture-frame, with the central part cut out, for the proper display of the picture." As a verb, "to mount (a print) on a cardboard backing," by 1965. Related: Matted; matting.

Related entries & more 
enlargement (n.)

1530s, "a release from confinement," from enlarge in the secondary Middle English sense "release a prisoner" (mid-15c.) + -ment. Meaning "act of increasing in size" is from 1560s. Photographic sense "picture of a larger size than the negative from which it was made" is from 1866.

Related entries & more 
idyll (n.)

also idyl, c. 1600, "short, picturesque pastoral poem," from French idylle (16c.) or directly Latin idyllium, from Greek eidyllion "short, descriptive poem, usually of rustic or pastoral type," literally "a little picture," diminutive of eidos "form" (see -oid).

Related entries & more 
painted (adj.)

c. 1300, "depicted in a picture;" early 15c., "coated with paint," past-participle adjective from paint (v.). In zoology, used of bright or highly colored creatures; painted-lady is from 1829 as a type of butterfly.

Related entries & more 
pictograph (n.)

"pictorial symbol, picture or symbol representing an idea," 1851, from picto-, combining form of Latin pictus "painted," past participle of pingere "to paint" (see paint (v.)) + -graph "something written." First used in reference to American Indian writing. Related: Pictography; pictographic.

Related entries & more 

Page 4