Etymology
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laughing-stock (n.)

also laughingstock; 1510s, formed by analogy with whipping-stock "whipping post," later also "object of frequent whipping" (but that word is not attested in writing in this sense until 1670s). See laughing + stock (n.1). Also in the same sense was jesting-stock (1530s), and compare gaping-stock "person or thing regarded as an object of wonder;" loathing-stock "person who is an object of general contempt" (1620s); scoffing-stock (1570s). A Latin word for it was irridiculum.

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inclined (adj.)
c. 1300, "having a mental tendency;" 1540s, "having a physical slope," past-participle adjective from incline (v.).
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corporeal (adj.)

1610s, "of a material or physical nature, not mental or spiritual," with adjectival suffix -al (1) + Latin corporeus "of the nature of a body," from corpus "body" (living or dead), from PIE *kwrpes, from root *kwrep- "body, form, appearance." Meaning "relating to a material body or physical thing" is from 1660s. Related: Corporeality, corporeally.

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juju (n.1)
object of religious veneration among West Africans, 1860, supposedly ultimately from French joujou "toy, plaything."
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psychosomatic (adj.)

1847, "pertaining to the relation between mind and body; relating to both soul and body," from Greek psykhē "mind" (see psyche) + sōmatikos, from sōma (genitive sōmatos) "body" (see somato-). Applied from 1938 to physical disorders with psychological causes. Etymologically, it could as easily apply to emotional disorders with physical causes, but it is rarely so used.

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yuan (n.)
Chinese unit of currency introduced 1914, from Chinese yuan "round, round object, circle."
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physio- 

word-forming element meaning "nature, natural, physical," from Greek physios "nature" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow").

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physiotherapy (n.)

"treatment of disease, injury, etc. by physical methods," 1905, from physio- + therapy. Related: Physiotherapist; physiotherapeutic.

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feeling (adj.)
c. 1400, "pertaining to the physical senses, sensory," present-participle adjective from feel (v.). Related: Feelingly.
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athleticism (n.)
1835, "devotion to athletics," from athletic + -ism. Also, by late 19c., "physical strength and capability of robust activity."
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