Etymology
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siddha (n.)

in Hinduism, "one who has attained perfection and bliss," 1846, from Sanskrit siddhah "accomplished, achieved, successful, possessing supernatural power, sorcerer, saint," related to sidhyati "reaches his goal, succeeds," sadhuh "right, skilled, excellent, a holy man."

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spirit (v.)
Origin and meaning of spirit

1590s, "to make more active or energetic" (of blood, alcohol, etc.), from spirit (n.). The meaning "carry off or away secretly" (as though by supernatural agency) is first recorded 1660s. Related: Spirited; spiriting.

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coact (v.)

"to compel, force," c. 1400, from Latin coactare "constrain, force," frequentative of cogere (past participle coactus) "to compel," also "curdle, collect" (see cogent). Related: Coacted; coacting; coaction; coactive. 

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main (n.)

Old English mægen (Mercian megen) "power, bodily strength; force, violent effort; strength of mind or will; efficacy; supernatural power," from Proto-Germanic *maginam "power" (source also of Old High German megin "strength, power, ability"), suffixed form of PIE root *magh- "to be able, have power."

Original sense of "power" is preserved in phrase might and main. Also used in Middle English for "royal power or authority" (c. 1400), "military strength" (c. 1300), "application of force" (c. 1300). Meaning "chief or main part" (c. 1600) now is archaic or obsolete. Meaning "principal duct, pipe, or channel in a utility system" is first recorded 1727 in main drain.

Used since 1540s for "continuous stretch of land or water;" in nautical jargon used loosely for "the ocean," but in Spanish Main the word is short for mainland and refers to the coast between Panama and Orinoco (as contrasted to the islands of the West Indies).

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prize (v.2)

"to force or press; force open by means of a lever," 1680s, from prize (n.) "the hold of a lever" (14c.), from Old French prise "a taking hold, a grasp" (see prize (n.2)). Related: Prized; prizing.

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forceful (adj.)

1570s, from force (n.) + -ful. Related: Forcefully; forcefulness.

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enforce (v.)

mid-14c., "to drive by physical force; to try, attempt, strive; to fortify, strengthen a place;" late 14c. as "exert force, compel; make stronger, reinforce; strengthen an argument; grow stronger, become violent," from Old French enforcier "strengthen, reinforce; use force (on), offer violence (to); oppress; violate, rape" (12c.) or a native formation from en- (1) "make, put in" + force (n.). Meaning "compel obedience to" (a law, etc.) is from 1640s. Related: Enforced; enforcing.

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dynamics (n.)

as a branch of physics that calculates motions in accordance with the laws of force, by 1752, from dynamic (adj.); also see -ics. As "the moving physical or moral force in anything," by 1833.

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dynamism (n.)

1831, "dynamic energy, force, drive," from Greek dynamis "power, might, strength" (see dynamic (adj.)) + -ism. As a name for philosophical systems that require some force to explain the phenomena of nature, by 1857.

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