Etymology
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parts (n.)

"personal qualities, gifts of ability, share of mental endowments or acquirements," 1560s, from part (n.).

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damaging (adj.)

"causing hurt or loss to person, character, or estate," 1849, present-participle adjective from damage (v.). Related: Damagingly (1849). Earlier in the same sense were damageous (late 14c.), damageful (mid-15c.), both now obsolete.

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stash (n.)
"hoard, cache," 1914, from stash (v.). Slang sense of "personal supply of narcotics" is from 1942.
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impersonal (adj.)
mid-15c., a grammatical term, from Late Latin impersonalis, from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + personalis "personal" (see personal). Sense of "not connected with any person" is from 1620s; that of "not endowed with personality, having no conscious individuality" is from 1842. Related: impersonally.
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surrender (n.)
early 15c., in law, "a giving up" (of an estate, land grant, interest in property, etc.), from Anglo-French surrendre, Old French surrendre noun use of infinitive, "give up, deliver over" (see surrender (v.)).
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san 

Japanese honorific title suffixed to personal or family names, 1878, short form of more formal sama.

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Scott 

surname, by early 12c., from Old English Scott (see Scot); also a personal name in Old English.

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himself (pron.)
Old English him selfum, from dative/accusative personal pronoun him + self, here used as an inflected adjective.
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personalty (n.)

1540s, a legal term, "personal property" (in distinction from realty), from Anglo-French personaltie (late 15c.), corresponding to French personalite, from Medieval Latin personalitas (see personality).

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PIN 

acronym for personal identification number, 1981; from the first it has been used with a redundant number.

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