Etymology
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permeate (v.)

"to pass into or through without rupture or displacement," 1650s, from Latin permeatus, past participle of permeare "to pass through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + meare "to pass," from PIE root *mei- (1) "to change, go, move." Related: Permeated; permeating.

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select (adj.)

1560s, "chosen on account of special excellence or fitness," from Latin selectus, past participle of seligere "choose out, single out, select; separate, cull," from se- "apart" (see se-) + legere "to gather, select" (from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather").

"Carefully picked," hence "choice, of special excellence" (by 1580s). Related: Selectly; selectness. The noun meaning "a selected person or thing, that which is choice" is recorded from c. 1600.

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pervade (v.)

"to pass or flow through; to extend or diffuse (itself) throughout," 1650s, from Latin pervadere "spread or go through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + vadere "to go" (see vamoose). Related: Pervaded; pervading; pervasion.

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perfidy (n.)

"breach of faith or trust, base treachery," 1590s, from French perfidie (16c.), from Latin perfidia "faithlessness, falsehood, treachery," from perfidus "faithless," from phrase per fidem decipere "to deceive through trustingness," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + fidem (nominative fides) "faith" (from PIE root *bheidh- "to trust, confide, persuade").

[C]ombinations of wickedness would overwhelm the world by the advantage which licentious principles afford, did not those who have long practiced perfidy grow faithless to each other. [Samuel Johnson, "Life of Waller"]
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perfusion (n.)

"a pouring through, a causing to permeate," 1570s, from French perfusion and directly from Latin perfusionem (nominative perfusio) "a pouring over," noun of action from past-participle stem of perfundere "pour out," from per "throughout" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + fundere "to pour" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour").

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aseity (n.)
"a being by itself, independent existence," 1690s, from Medieval Latin aseitas "state of being by itself," from Latin a "from" (see ab-) + se "oneself" (see suicide).
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perambulate (v.)

"walk through, about, or over," 1560s, from Latin perambulatus, past participle of perambulare "to walk through, go through, ramble through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Related: Perambulated; perambulating.

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percolation (n.)

"the act of straining or filtering through some porous material," 1610s, from Latin percolationem (nominative percolatio) "a straining through; the act of filtering," noun of action from past-participle stem of percolare "to strain through, filter," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + colare "to strain," from colum "a strainer," which is of uncertain origin.

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percentage (n.)

"a proportion or rate per hundred," 1789, from percent + -age. Commercial sense of "profit, advantage" is from 1862.

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megacycle (n.)

"one million cycles" (of oscillation), 1928, from mega- + cycle (n.). Often meaning "one million cycles per second."

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