Etymology
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paramount (adj.)

"supreme, superior in power or jurisdiction," 1530s, from Anglo-French paramont, Old French paramont "above" (in place, order, degree), mid-14c., from Old French par "by," from Latin per "through, for, by" (see per (prep.)) + amont "up," from a mont "upward" (see amount (v.)). The word is equivalent to the Latin phrase per ad montem, literally "to the hill." Related: Paramountcy.

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mph 
also m.p.h., abbreviation of miles per hour, attested from 1887.
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seclude (v.)

mid-15c., secluden, transitive, "to cut off from, shut or keep out" (implied in ben secluded), a sense now archaic, from Latin secludere "shut off, confine," from se- "apart" (see se-) + -cludere, variant of claudere "to shut" (see close (v.)). The meaning "remove or guard from public view" is recorded from 1620s. Related: Secluded; secluding.

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pellucid (adj.)

"transparent, translucent, admitting the passage of light," 1610s, from Latin pellucidus "transparent," from pellucere "shine through," from per- "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + lucere "to shine" (from suffixed form of PIE root *leuk- "light, brightness"). Related: Pellucidly; pellucidity.

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perfuse (v.)

early 15c., perfusen, "to wash away;" 1520s, "to sprinkle, pour or spread over or through," from Latin perfusus, past participle of perfundere "to pour over, besprinkle," from per (see per) + fundere "to pour, melt" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour").

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perchance (adv.)

"perhaps, possibly, maybe," mid-14c., parchaunce, from Old French par cheance, literally "by chance." With Latin per substituted c. 1400 for French cognate par. See per + chance (n.).

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segregate (v.)

1540s, "separate (someone or something) from a generally body or class of things," from Latin segregatus, past participle of segregare "set apart, lay aside; isolate; divide," literally "separate from the flock," from *se gregare, from se "apart from" (see se-) + grege, ablative of grex "herd, flock" (from PIE root *ger- "to gather").

Originally often with reference to the religious notion of separating the flock of the godly from the sinners, later scientifically in reference to classifications. In modern social context, "to force or enforce racial separation and exclusion," by 1898. Intransitive sense of "separate, go apart" is by 1863. Related: Segregated; segregating.

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permute (v.)

late 14c., permuten, "to change one for another, to interchange," from Old French permuter and directly from Latin permutare "to change thoroughly," from per "thoroughly" (see per) + mutare "to change" (from PIE root *mei- (1) "to change, go, move"). The mathematical sense is from 1878 (see permutation).

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mil (n.)

1721, in per mil "per thousand," from Latin mille "thousand" (see million); compare percent. As a unit of length for diameter of wire (equal to .001 of an inch) it is attested from 1891; as a unit of angular measure it is recorded by 1907.

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secession (n.)
Origin and meaning of secession

1530s, from Latin secessionem (nominative secessio) "a withdrawal, separation; political withdrawal, insurrection, schism," noun of action from past-participle stem of secedere "go away, withdraw, separate; rebel, revolt," from se- "apart" (see se-) + cedere "to go" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield").

Originally in a Roman historical context, "temporary migration of plebeians from the city to compel patricians to address their grievances." Modern use is by 1650s in reference to "act of withdrawing from a religious or political union."

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