Etymology
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No results were found for pater. Showing results for paper.
letter-head (n.)

also letterhead, "sheet of paper with a printed or engraved logo or address," 1868, short for letterheading (1867); from letter (n.1) + heading (n.) in the printing sense. So called because it was printed at the "head" of the sheet of paper.

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cashless (adj.)

1833, "penniless," from cash (n.) + -less. Of financial transactions, "done without paper money or specie," 1947.

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charter (n.)

"formal written instrument bestowing privileges and rights, serving as legal evidence of them," c. 1200, from Old French chartre (12c.) "charter, letter, document, covenant," from Latin chartula/cartula, literally "little paper," diminutive of charta/carta "paper, document" (see chart (n.)). The meaning "aircraft hired for a particular purpose" is from 1922.

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notepad (n.)

also note-pad, "pad of paper for writing notes," 1907, from note (n.) + pad (n.).

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visa (n.)

1831, "official signature or endorsement on a passport," from French visa, from Modern Latin charta visa "verified paper," literally "paper that has been seen," from fem. past participle of Latin videre "to see" (from PIE root *weid- "to see"). Earlier visé (1810), from French past participle of viser "to examine, view." The credit card of this name was introduced 1976, replacing BankAmericard.

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deckle (n.)

1810, in paper-making, "rectangular frame on which the pulp is placed," from German deckel "lid, little cover," diminutive of decke "cover," from Old High German decchen "to cover," from Proto-Germanic *thakjan, from PIE root *(s)teg- "to cover." Meaning "rough or raw edge of paper" is by 1858.

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printing (adj.)

present-participle adjective from print (v.). Printing press "machine for taking impression from an inked surface upon paper" is from 1580s.

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shinplaster (n.)

also shin-plaster, piece of paper soaked in vinegar, etc. and used by the poor as a home remedy to treat sores on the legs, the thing itself attested by 1771; from shin (n.) + plaster (n.). In U.S. history, it became a jocular phrase or slang term of abuse for devalued low-denomination paper currency (by 1817).

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insert (n.)

"something inserted," 1893, especially a paper, etc., placed in among the pages of a newspaper, magazine, etc., from insert (v.).

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billfold (n.)

"folding pocketbook for paper money," 1879, from bill (n.1) + fold, here perhaps short for folder.

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