Etymology
Advertisement
viva voce 
also viva-voce, "by word of mouth," 1580s, Latin, literally "living-voice," ablative of viva vox.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
megaphone (n.)

"funnel-like instrument for assisting hearing or magnifying the voice," 1878, coined (perhaps by Thomas Edison, who invented it) from Greek megas "great" (see mega-) + phone "voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say"). Related: Megaphonic. In Greek, megalophonia meant "grandiloquence," megalophonos "loud-voiced."

Related entries & more 
calliope (n.)

"harsh-sounding steam-whistle keyboard organ," 1858, named incongruously for Calliope, ninth and chief muse, presiding over eloquence and epic poetry, Latinized from Greek Kalliope, literally "beauty of voice," from kalli-, combining form of kallos "beauty" (see Callisto) + opos (genitive of *ops) "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

Related entries & more 
baritone (n.)

c. 1600, "male voice between tenor and bass," from Italian baritono, from Greek barytonos "deep-toned, deep-sounding," from barys "heavy, deep," also, of sound, "strong, deep, bass" (from PIE root *gwere- (1) "heavy") + tonos "tone," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch."

Technically, "ranging from lower A in bass clef to lower F in treble clef." The meaning "singer having a baritone voice" is from 1821. As a type of brass band instrument, it is attested from 1949. As an adjective, by 1729 in reference to the voice, 1854 of musical instruments (originally the concertina).

Related entries & more 
euphony (n.)

mid-15c., from French euphonie, from Late Latin euphonia, from Greek euphonia "sweetness of voice," related to euphonos "well-sounding," from eu- "good" (see eu-) + phone "sound, voice," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say." Related: Euphonic (1782); euphonical (1660s); euphonious (1774). Hence, also, euphonium (1864), the musical instrument.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
soprano (n.)
1738, "the highest singing voice," ranging easily through the two octaves above middle C, from Italian soprano "the treble in music," literally "high," from sopra "above," from Latin supra, fem. ablative singular of super "above, over" (see super-). Meaning "a singer having a soprano voice" is from 1738. As an adjective from 1730. Soprano saxophone is attested from 1859.
Related entries & more 
roughness (n.)

late 14c., roughnesse, "state or quality of being rough to the touch; hoarseness of voice," from rough (adj.) + -ness.

Related entries & more 
basso 
in various musical terms borrowed from Italian, "bass, a bass voice," from Italian basso, from Late Latin bassus "short, low" (see base (adj.)).
Related entries & more 
supposed (adj.)
"believed or thought to exist," 1580s, past-participle adjective from suppose (v.); often with the -e- pronounced, to distinguish it from the passive past tense supposed, now common in the sense of "to have a duty or obligation" (1859).
Related entries & more 
paralanguage (n.)

"non-phonemic vocal factors in speech" (tone of voice, tempo, etc.), 1958, from para- (1) + language. Related: Paralinguistic.

Related entries & more 

Page 4