Etymology
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traverse (n.)
"act of passing through a gate, crossing a bridge, etc.," mid-14c., from Old French travers, from traverser (see traverse (v.)). Meaning "a passage by which one may traverse" is recorded from 1670s. Military fortification sense of "barrier, barricade" is recorded from 1590s.
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Polaroid (n.)
material which in thin sheets produces a high degree of plane polarization of light passing through it, 1936, proprietary name (Sheet Polarizer Co., Union City, N.J.). As a type of camera producing prints rapidly, it is attested from 1961.
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regressive (adj.)

1630s, "passing back, returning, acting in a backward direction;" see regress + -ive. Opposed to progressive. In reference to taxation that weighs proportionately heavier on those with lower incomes, it is attested by 1888. Related: Regressively; regressiveness; regressivity.

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outre (adj.)

"exaggerated, extravagant, eccentric, passing the bounds of what is usual or proper," 1722, from French outré "exaggerated, excessive, extreme," past participle of outrer "to carry to excess, overdo, overstrain, exaggerate," from outre "beyond," from Latin ultra "beyond" (from suffixed form of PIE root *al- "beyond").

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run-in (n.)

"quarrel, confrontation," 1905, from the verbal phrase; see run (v.) + in (adv.). From 1857 as "an act of running in," along with the verbal phrase run in "pay a short, passing visit." Earlier to run in meant "to rush in" in attacking (1815).

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intransitive (adj.)
1610s, from Late Latin intransitivus "not transitive, not passing over" (to another person), Priscian's term, from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Latin transitivus "that may pass over," from transire "to pass over" (see transitive). The noun meaning "an intransitive verb" is attested from 1824.
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decrescendo (n.)

in music, "a gradual diminution in force, a passing from loud to soft," 1806, from Italian decrescendo, present participle of decrescere, from Latin decrescere "to grow less, diminish," from de "away from" (see de-) + crescere "to grow" (from PIE root *ker- (2) "to grow"). Also as an adjective and adverb.

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discursive (adj.)

1590s, "passing rapidly from one subject to another," from French discursif, from Medieval Latin discursivus, from Latin discursus "a running about," in Late Latin "conversation," in Medieval Latin "reasoning" (see discourse (n.)). As "relating to the understanding" (often opposed to intuitive), from c. 1600. Related: Discursively.

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scent (n.)

c. 1400, sent, "a smell, what can be smelled" (especially a trace left by an animal in passing used as a means of pursuit by a hound), also "perception, sensation" (the etymological sense); from scent (v.). Often figurative, of pursuits or inquiries of any kind. Almost always applied to agreeable odors; the meaning "a perfume, fragrant liquid distilled from flowers, etc." is by late 15c. (Caxton).

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allude (v.)

1530s, "to mock" (transitive, now obsolete), from French alluder or directly from Latin alludere "to play, make fun of, joke, jest," also of waves lapping the shore, from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + ludere "to play" (see ludicrous). Meaning "make an indirect reference, point in passing" is from 1530s. Related: Alluded; alluding.

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