Etymology
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publicity (n.)

1791, "state or condition of being public or open to the observation and inquiry of a community," from French publicité (1690s), from Medieval Latin publicitatem (nominative publicitas), from Latin publicus (see public (adj.)). Sense of "a making (something) known, an exposure to the public" is from 1826, shading by c. 1900 into "advertising, the business of promotion." Publicity stunt is recorded by 1908.

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augury (n.)

late 14c., "divination from the flight of birds," from Old French augure, augurie "divination, soothsaying, sorcery, enchantment," or directly from Latin augurium "divination, the observation and interpretation of omens" (see augur (n.)). Sense of "omen, portent, indication, that which forebodes" is from 1610s. Often in plural, auguries.

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outwit (v.)

"to get the better of by superior wits, defeat or frustrate by superior ingenuity," 1650s, from out- + wit (n.). Related: Outwitted; outwitting. Middle English had a noun outwit "external powers of perception, bodily senses; knowledge gained by observation or experience" (late 14c.; compare inwit).

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award (v.)
late 14c., "decide after careful observation," from Anglo-French awarder, from Old North French eswarder (Old French esgarder) "decide, judge, give one's opinion" (after careful consideration), from es- "out" (see ex-) + warder "to watch," a word from Germanic (see ward (n.)). Related: Awarded; awarding.
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lurk (v.)
c. 1300, lurken "to hide, lie hidden," probably from Scandinavian (compare dialectal Norwegian lurka "to sneak away," dialectal Swedish lurka "to be slow in one's work"), perhaps ultimately related to Middle English luren "to frown, lurk" (see lower (v.2)). From late 14c. as "move about secretly;" also "escape observation." Related: Lurked; lurking.
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detection (n.)

early 15c., "accusation," from Late Latin detectionem (nominative detectio) "an uncovering, a revealing," noun of action from past-participle stem of detegere  "uncover, expose," figuratively "discover, reveal, disclose," from de "un-, off" (see de-) + tegere "to cover," from PIE root *(s)teg- "to cover." From 1610s as "discovery, finding by search or observation," especially "act of finding out and bringing to light."

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conceal (v.)

early 14c., concelen, "to keep close or secret, forbear to divulge," from Old French conceler "to hide, conceal, dissimulate," from Latin concelare "to hide," from con-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see con-), + celare "to hide" (from PIE root *kel- (1) "to cover, conceal, save"). From early 15c. as "to hide or shield from observation." Replaced Old English deagan. Related: Concealed; concealing; concealable.

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apperceive (v.)
c. 1300, "to perceive, notice," especially of internal observation (a sense now obsolete), from Old French apercevoir "perceive, notice, become aware of" (11c.), from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + percipere "gather, seize entirely," also, figuratively, "to grasp with the mind, learn, comprehend" (see perceive. In modern psychological use (1876), a back-formation from apperception (q.v.). Related: Apperceived; apperceiving; apperceptive.
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auspices (n.)
plural (and now the usual form) of auspice (1530s), "observation of birds for the purpose of taking omens," from French auspice (14c.), from Latin auspicum "divination from the flight of birds; function of an auspex" (q.v.). Meaning "any indication of the future (especially favorable)" is from 1650s; earlier (1630s) in extended sense of "benevolent influence of greater power, influence exerted on behalf of someone or something," originally in expression under the auspices of.
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privacy (n.)

1590s, "a private or personal matter, a secret;" c. 1600 as "seclusion, state of being in retirement from company or the knowledge and observation of others," from private (adj.) + abstract noun suffix -cy. Meaning "state of freedom from intrusion or interference" is from 1814. Earlier was privatie (late 14c. as "secret, mystery;" c. 1400 as "a secret, secret deed; solitude, privacy"), from Old French privauté.

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