Etymology
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papyrus (n.)

late 14c., papirus, from Latin papyrus "the paper plant," also the paper made from it, from Greek papyros "any plant of the paper plant genus," a loan-word of unknown origin, often said to be Egyptian. The classically correct plural is papyri. A type of rush or reed formerly abundant on marshy river banks in Egypt, Palestine, etc., it afforded the ancient Egyptians a convenient and inexpensive writing surface. Related: Papyraceous.

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clevis (n.)

"U-shaped iron bar with holes at the ends for a bolt or pin, used as a fastener," 1590s, of unknown origin; perhaps from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse klofi "a cleft," from Proto-Germanic *klub‑ "a splitting," from PIE root *gleubh- "to tear apart, cleave." Also uncertain is whether it is originally a plural or a singular.

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letter-head (n.)
also letterhead, "sheet of paper with a printed or engraved logo or address," 1868, short for letterheading (1867); from letter (n.1) + heading (n.) in the printing sense. So called because it was printed at the "head" of the sheet of paper.
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pen (v.1)

"to write, compose and commit to paper," late 15c., from pen (n.1). Related: Penned; penning.

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blotting (n.)
mid-15c., verbal noun from blot (v.). Blotting-paper is recorded from 1510s.
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newsprint (n.)

"cheap paper from pulp, used to print newspapers," 1903, from news (n.) + print.

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cashless (adj.)

1833, "penniless," from cash (n.) + -less. Of financial transactions, "done without paper money or specie," 1947.

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charter (n.)

"formal written instrument bestowing privileges and rights, serving as legal evidence of them," c. 1200, from Old French chartre (12c.) "charter, letter, document, covenant," from Latin chartula/cartula, literally "little paper," diminutive of charta/carta "paper, document" (see chart (n.)). Meaning "aircraft hired for a particular purpose" is from 1922.

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deckle (n.)

1810, in paper-making, "rectangular frame on which the pulp is placed," from German deckel "lid, little cover," diminutive of decke "cover," from Old High German decchen "to cover," from Proto-Germanic *thakjan, from PIE root *(s)teg- "to cover." Meaning "rough or raw edge of paper" is by 1858.

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notepad (n.)

also note-pad, "pad of paper for writing notes," 1907, from note (n.) + pad (n.).

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